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Let's say you have an EASA-style logbook with European flight time, and then, you start flying in the USA, so you buy an FAA-style logbook and begin logging hours for your flights in the USA.

I don't think it is a good practice to mix foreign hours, since if both logbooks are still open you can have inaccuracies and inconsistencies in the transferred hours.

The question is: is it mandatory to bring your flying hours from the European logbook to the "AMOUNT FORWARD" section in the American logbook, or is it optional?

What is a good practice if you have multiple foreign logbooks?

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    $\begingroup$ I'm curious why you would want to keep two logbooks? It seems like it would make totals and currency more difficult to track. FWIW, I learned to fly in South Africa and continued using the same logbook in the US. Instructors and examiners always comment on it and the layout is a little different, but it isn't a problem. And practically speaking, I use an online logbook for most day-to-day things anyway. $\endgroup$ – Pondlife May 23 '16 at 15:09
  • $\begingroup$ Also, in future questions be careful to target one question. If there are a multitude of question points, post a new question for each one. $\endgroup$ – Ryan Mortensen May 23 '16 at 16:08
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Is it mandatory to bring your flying hours from the European logbook to the "AMOUNT FORWARD" section in the American logbook?

No, it is not mandatory to bring your flying hours from the European logbook to the "AMOUNT FORWARD" section in the American logbook.

In the USA, logging time is not required at all other than information for required recent experience and check ride prerequisites. Also, there is no reason the EASA logbook is not an acceptable document for that purpose so long as it contains the needed information such as landings.

What is a good practice if you have multiple foreign logbooks?

Consolidate them into one logbook that best fits the system in which you do most of your flying and keep only specific additional requirements for the other systems logged elsewhere.

If you need to keep the total flight hours separate, I would use one of the customizable columns that I have seen in most logbooks and label it with whichever system you fly in less. Then you can simply subtract that column from your grand total to deduce the other system's total time.

Although, based on how much I get picked on by my German friends for not using the metric system, I could understand the assumption that we must be different.

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    $\begingroup$ You might want to qualify the point about "flight time is flight time". E.g. in my answer to this question I found a UK reg that says not all US flight time - specifically, PIC time - can be counted towards an EASA or UK rating. $\endgroup$ – Pondlife May 23 '16 at 16:20
  • $\begingroup$ @Pondlife 10-4 thank you! $\endgroup$ – Ryan Mortensen May 23 '16 at 18:12

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