2
$\begingroup$

Sorry for the complicated Question.

I was wondering (after reading this report) if a two-engine air plane has an alternative operating scheme/setting for the remaining engine. Maybe a setting which is not that fuel efficient but more stable with respect to compressor surge and stall.

In the cited report one engine suffered compressor stall (maybe by bird-strike) and was subsequently shut down. The other engine was reported to have left a trail.

$\endgroup$
2
$\begingroup$

Aircrews regularly practice emergency procedures for engine out scenarios in their training and simulations.

Aircraft manufacturers and airlines provide procedural outlines for various possible emergency conditions specific to the type of aircraft.

During an in flight emergency, fuel efficiency is not a priority. The aircrew is to ensure safe flight of the aircraft and the priority becomes landing quickly and safely. This may require use of the engine in any fashion to keep the aircraft in flight.

In the report you reference, there is no real way to know what (if anything) caused what appeared to be a trail of smoke seen by another person in another aircraft waiting to take off.

$\endgroup$
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ Maybe my question was not precisely enough worded. My question was only triggered by the report and meant a lot more general. I was wondering if there exists a switch in the cockpit which alters the control law of the engine. $\endgroup$ – rul30 Apr 27 '16 at 4:02
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ Not sure what you mean by "control law", but flight controls and the throttle to the remaining engine is the key to stabilizing flight after failure of the other engine. $\endgroup$ – CharlieRB Apr 27 '16 at 11:59
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ I was thing of an alternate FADEC control law $\endgroup$ – rul30 Apr 27 '16 at 12:04

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.