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Does any country legally require the window blinds to be open for takeoff and landing? I'm asking about legal regulations that specifically mention window blinds, not airline procedures or general 'follow the crew instructions' regulations.

I only need one example, whether it's FAA, EASA, a national CAA or some other regulator, or an ICAO standard or recommendation.

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    $\begingroup$ welcome to aviation.SE. As seen previously, there seem to be no regulation and it really depends on the airline internal SOP. What makes you think that there is a regulation? $\endgroup$
    – Federico
    Commented Apr 26, 2016 at 12:19
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    $\begingroup$ The airline's policy says if it is necessary or not. As far as I know, there is no regulation for this, and it is used according to the safet y procedures adopted by the company. $\endgroup$ Commented Apr 26, 2016 at 12:23
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    $\begingroup$ Very related: Why do we open the window shades during landing and take-off? (on skeptics.se) $\endgroup$
    – Jamiec
    Commented Apr 26, 2016 at 12:28
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    $\begingroup$ There is a regulation which indirectly covers it. Certainly in the UK and I'm pretty sure in the US and EASA land, it is an offence to not comply with the lawful instruction of a member of the crew. Therefore, if you are asked to raise the blinds, it is a legal requirement for you to do so. $\endgroup$
    – Simon
    Commented Apr 26, 2016 at 16:35
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    $\begingroup$ @mins. Nope, it's exactly what it says. Failing to comply with an instruction which is not itself illegal is an offence. Rarely used but it has been. Usually, the cabin crew will just mark you down as "idiot" and do it themselves. But, if it is clear that you understand and that you are able to comply, you might be removed from the flight and prosecuted. Generic laws like this, e.g. "dangerous driving" are there to provide for reasonable action when a specific law does not apply. Not raising the blinds when instructed is, quite simply, an offence in the UK. $\endgroup$
    – Simon
    Commented Apr 26, 2016 at 18:56

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There is a regulation which indirectly covers it. Certainly in the UK and I'm pretty sure in the US and EASA land, it is an offence to not comply with the lawful instruction of a member of the crew. Therefore, if you are asked to raise the blinds, it is a legal requirement for you to do so.

Failing to comply with an instruction which is not itself illegal is an offence. Rarely used but it has been. Usually, the cabin crew will just mark you down as "idiot" and do it themselves. But, if it is clear that you understand and that you are able to comply, you might be removed from the flight and prosecuted. Generic laws like this, e.g. "dangerous driving" are there to provide for reasonable action when a specific law does not apply.

A valid defence would be to demonstrate that you were unable to comply to the extent that the prosecution is unable to convince a jury of your peers to find you guilty "beyond reasonable doubt".

So, in summary, albeit indirectly, it is a legal requirement for you to raise the blind when asked to do so in the UK.

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  • $\begingroup$ "[I'm not asking about] airline procedures or general 'follow the crew instructions' regulations." $\endgroup$ Commented Jul 21, 2016 at 13:19
  • $\begingroup$ @J.Hougaard Ah, got it. To be honest, I hadn't re-read the question after the edit. Want me to delete? $\endgroup$
    – Simon
    Commented Jul 21, 2016 at 18:09

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