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I was looking for A319neo, A320neo and A321neo IATA code all over the net but I could't find it, can someone help me with this.

(As of 9 March, 2018, the answer with the highest up-vote count (from April 2016) states "will likely be the same as". A more definitive answer should be available now.)

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The IATA three letter code for the Neo will likely be the same as for the regular model. Unfortunately the IATA code list is copyrighted, and I can't find a public document that confirms it.

The more commonly used ICAO type designator, a four letter code can be found in ICAO doc 8643. It contains a list of all common aircraft and their codes.

The ICAO type designator for the neo will be the same as for the regular versions. So A319, A320 and A321. Only if the performance of the Neo aircraft significantly differs from the originals, then a dedicated designator will be created.

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    $\begingroup$ Note that NEO is, despite its business importance, very small change of the design. A318–A320 don't even get new revision number; they are still A318-100, A319-100 and A320-200 (A320 was revised early on, before they even started to build the other sizes). Only A321 is upgraded to -200, because with winglets it seems to be getting the series standard wings instead of the modified ones of A321-100. And the ICAO and IATA identifiers don't make difference between A320-100 and A320-200, so they are unlikely to make it between A321-100 and A321-200 and even less so between A320-211 and A320-251N. $\endgroup$ – Jan Hudec Apr 21 '16 at 9:50
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    $\begingroup$ The IATA code for A320 with wingtip fences is 320. The code for the Sharklet equipped A320s is 32A. I'm sure the Neo will get a new code. $\endgroup$ – STavlla Nov 5 '16 at 3:21
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There are now ICAO designators for the A3XX Neo aircraft:

  • A319 Neo: A19N
  • A320 Neo: A20N
  • A321 Neo: A21N

Source

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    $\begingroup$ For completeness, do you have a reference for that? $\endgroup$ – FreeMan Jun 9 '17 at 12:58
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    $\begingroup$ While this is interesting, it does not actually answer the original question. $\endgroup$ – J. Hougaard Jun 9 '17 at 15:16
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As mentioned by @CrabLab: Snapshot of the reference

Reference: A document by ICAO.

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    $\begingroup$ This doesn't answer the question. The question asks for the IATA aircraft type code. This is the ICAO aircraft type designator. They differ. For example, a A300-600F has a ICAO code of A306, but a IATA code of ABY. ICAO codes are separated by aircraft performance for ATC purposes, IATA codes are for reservation and booking systems. $\endgroup$ – user71659 Mar 11 '18 at 17:36
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IATA and ICAO codes are not the same. The requested IATA codes are used for ticketing and are not freely available.


There is also a webpage for the Common IATA Aircraft Codes.

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