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CPL holder can be PIC on any plane if it's not a commercial air transport. So if the flight is positioning, acceptance, testing, delivery or any other without cargo and passengers any CPL holder provided he/she has TR and special training for the left seat can act as PIC? Do airlines allow this maybe as bonus for young first officers? Another option is big business jets like 737 747 BBJ, A319...

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    $\begingroup$ I doubt it because it would also require a type rating. The issue is that to be PIC in a type rated aircraft requires quite a few hours. $\endgroup$ – Ron Beyer Apr 14 '16 at 19:37
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    $\begingroup$ It is possible but hard: aviation.stackexchange.com/questions/23404/… $\endgroup$ – SMS von der Tann Apr 14 '16 at 20:32
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    $\begingroup$ Being PIC on a multi-crew aircraft requires an ATP(L) in, I think, every jurisdiction. Which comes after 1500 hours. $\endgroup$ – Ben Apr 14 '16 at 21:20
  • $\begingroup$ Which country's regulations are you asking about? (Please add a tag such as faa-regulations, easa-regulations, etc. so that we know how to answer.) $\endgroup$ – Lnafziger Oct 1 '16 at 21:28
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There have been periods of time in the past (and I think at present as well) where a lack of experienced pilots meant airlines had to resort to hiring CPL's as SIC's on turboprop and some regional jets. I know that American Eagle did that for a while -- they used to call them the 500 hour wonders. Some were hired with even less time if they showed exceptional skills.

However, to log PIC time in an aircraft that requires an ATP ticket, you have to have the ticket. Sole manipulator of the controls is not enough for a CPL to log the time as PIC on those aircraft.

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  • $\begingroup$ In what regulatory environment is your answer valid? $\endgroup$ – Lnafziger Oct 1 '16 at 21:27
  • $\begingroup$ USA FARs. Here's some FAA guidance on the subject. link $\endgroup$ – Juan Jimenez Oct 1 '16 at 21:32
  • $\begingroup$ Aircraft don't require an ATP in the US, but certain operations do (121, 135 with passengers, etc.) $\endgroup$ – Lnafziger Oct 1 '16 at 21:34
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    $\begingroup$ For that matter, your entire second paragraph is incorrect. Even in operations requiring an ATP in order to be PIC, if the SIC is rated in the aircraft they can log PIC for that time where they act as sole manipulator of the flight controls regardless of the fact that they are not legally able to be the PIC. (This is consistent with the link that you posted in the comment as well.) $\endgroup$ – Lnafziger Oct 1 '16 at 21:47

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