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Are there any statistics on the distribution of pilots between the two genders? Specifically, has the ratio changed over the past decades (I'd expect female pilots to be getting more common)?

I'm aware that the number will vary between countries. I'm more interested in the trend of certain group(s) that are statistically significant to an area (e.g. all commercial carriers in the United Kingdom / all PPL holders in the United States).

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  • $\begingroup$ Edited wordings. I'm just curious to know the general trend over, say the past 30 years. $\endgroup$ – kevin Apr 12 '16 at 13:53
  • $\begingroup$ I assume you're not asking for countries were women are not allowed to drive a car. $\endgroup$ – mins Apr 12 '16 at 17:19
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At least for the FAA, you can get the U.S. Civil Airmen Statistics as a download that covers from 2005 to 2014. It includes data based on gender and license type. I'm not sure when they will update for 2015. If you download the 2010 one, it has data back to 2001, so about 13 years of data.

Here is an example of the data provided:

enter image description here

Similarly for the UK, you can download statistics from this website. I haven't downloaded them but it looks like what you are looking for is there.

You may be able to find similar data for Canada, Australia, and some other relatively "open" countries.

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    $\begingroup$ This makes me want to know more about that one last flight navigator holdout. $\endgroup$ – AEhere supports Monica Nov 21 '19 at 8:56
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Air Canada's pilots are about 95% male and that is about average for all North American airlines. The Air Line Pilots Association, which represents pilots in Canada and the U.S., recently reported that 5.4 per cent of members are women. British Airways said in 2013 that 200 of its 3,500 pilots are women – about 5.7 per cent.

Air Canada's first female pilot was hired in 1978 and recently retired after 37 years. Air Canada's first female pilot retires, 95 per cent are still men

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  • $\begingroup$ Why is this?.... $\endgroup$ – Cloud Jun 13 '18 at 13:55

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