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This question already has an answer here:

Is there a big demand for transporting overseas for turbofan engines with nacelles like TrentXWB or GEnx by cargo airplanes ? If yes, what planes are used?

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marked as duplicate by Peter Kämpf, Firee, Him, SMS von der Tann, RedGrittyBrick Mar 27 '16 at 9:53

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Engine nacelles are part of the aircraft and not the engine. I think you're asking about fully assembled engines.

Oversized jet engines are usually transported by road when possible; in case air transport is required, the Antonov An-124 'Ruslan' is your best bet. It is the only aircraft capable of transporting engines like the Engine Alliance GP7000 and RR Trent XWB.

An 124

Image from antonov.com

For smaller engines (or partially disassembled ones), other aircraft like the Boeing 747F and A330-200F are used.

Interestingly, this filing with US DoT shows the An-124 being used to transport GE GEnx engines from Rickenbacker airport to Seattle to ensure smooth production in Boeing factories.

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  • $\begingroup$ I am person who asked this question. I know that an124 transport fully assembled GEnx, but this was emergency need. I am interested on how regular volumes are transported overseas such as Trent1000 from UK to Seattle. It could be by B747F if outer nacelle separately from core, but this is my assumption. I also presume that GE90 are transported by truck from Ohio to Seattle, as well as Trents to Toulouse, its not overseas as well. Am I correct. But if it is necessary to deliver Trent from UK to Singapore of GE from Ohio to Hamburg - how it is done ? By an124? But it is expensive! Who knows? $\endgroup$ – sergei Mar 27 '16 at 12:02
  • $\begingroup$ Notice this picture shows the engine already mounted on the vehicle needed to mount the engine. $\endgroup$ – Howard Miller Mar 28 '16 at 7:30
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I can't really answer this, but generally, there's no reason to transport fully assembled engines. They'd have to be taken apart into order to be installed anyway. The props would overbalance and overload the assembly used to raise and position the engine to properly bolt it in place. The cowling would have to be removed to allow access to connecting lines to the aircraft. Ditto the prop. Besides, in most engine changes, there's no reason to replace the cowling.

I once flew on a C-130 that was carrying a R-28 engine for a C-124. It wasn't even a strain.

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  • $\begingroup$ Prop engine would be transport without the prop but what about turbo fan engine? They can be transported as a single unit and installed as such. $\endgroup$ – vasin1987 Mar 26 '16 at 13:30
  • $\begingroup$ Yeah, that would be more difficult. And Less difficult. A propellor is kind of clunky to carry. A turbofan with fit nicely in some cargo craft (C-130s to C-17s, yet a complete engine is still unneccesary. External cowling, for one thing. If the cowling's damaged, the plane's probably's beyond flying and will need some support personnel and tools. Any ancillary equipment that's also necessary to the engine will not be brought along. I've flown in a C-141 carrying a complete (though partially disassembled) huey and a 4 door Chevy. It's amazing what you can pack in on of those things. $\endgroup$ – Howard Miller Mar 28 '16 at 7:28

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