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I've always wanted to be a pilot from the age of 3. I've always dreamed about flying high in the sky above the clouds and getting that amazing experience that you can't get any other way.

I'm now turning 16 and am realising it is coming close for me to start my goal of becoming a pilot.

I would appreciate if anyone could give me some advice on what to do to become a pilot.

What qualifications you need? Where you train? Wages? What are the health requirements? Etc

This is for a pilot in the UK who is hoping to work in Dubai for Emirates.

Thanks.

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closed as primarily opinion-based by Simon, jklingler, Federico, GdD, RockPaperLizard Mar 11 '16 at 9:12

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • $\begingroup$ Typically to get to work for an airline like Emirates, you are going to have to put in many years of experience at smaller regional airlines and work your way up into the "major leagues". Some companies like Emirates have very high entrance standards so make sure you stay educated, out of trouble, and proficient throughout the journey to that company. Try to connect with an Emirates pilot and find out how they got to where they are. $\endgroup$ – Ron Beyer Mar 11 '16 at 15:18
  • $\begingroup$ There's only one place I can think of that will take an untrained person and teach them to fly and pay them for it rather than the other way around: the military. $\endgroup$ – TomMcW Mar 11 '16 at 23:48
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What you could do right now is train to be a glider pilot. You probably already have the right age. It is a wonderful experience, and it will be a good basis for a power license.

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  • $\begingroup$ What I hear from other pilots I know is that learning to glide actually makes you a much better powered pilot as it teaches you the importance of coordinated flight and using your feet whereas it's easy to be sloppy with your feet if you've never done it before. Good footwork is important in flying. Also, gliding will give you great experience in judging the flight envelope of any airplane... In gliding you learn to make the best and most efficient use of the only energy source you have - altitude and gravity (okay, thermals, but yeah). I plan on learning to glide one of these years soon. $\endgroup$ – Pugz Mar 11 '16 at 7:06
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Remember that the great majority of pilots don't get paid to fly, we pay to fly - for lessons, renting or buying a plane, fuel, etc. There's a big difference between the effort, qualifications, and money needed to become a private pilot, and what's needed to become a comercial or airline pilot. In the US, at least, anyone in reasonably good health can become a sport or private pilot.

I hope I'm not offending anyone here when I say that being a commercial pilot is work, and making just about anything into an 8-5 job can take the edge off that amazing experience. Or at least it seems that way to this private pilot :-)

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