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Slip Skid Indicator as depicted in the picture below;

What's the significance of Slip Skid Indicator?

How Slip Skid Indicator is used in flying the aircraft?

What are other performance/operations needs to be taken care while this exceeds its normal bound?

Primary flight display with Slip Skid Indicator, Source - www.aboutflight.com

Primary flight display with Slip Skid Indicator, Source - www.aboutflight.com

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The slip/skid indicator is the small bar under the roll pointer. The image below should clarify that.

slip/skid indicator

Image from flightlearnings.com

The Slip/Skid Indicator (sometimes called turn-and-bank indicator) moves left and right relative to the roll pointer in proportion to lateral acceleration and helps the pilot correct for any deviations in a turn.

In a level flight, the indicator is centered. Assume that the pilot is executing a left turn (the roll pointer would've moved left)- if the indicator is in center, it means that the turn is coordinated i.e. the aircraft is not slipping or skidding.

If the indicator (bar) is moving right, it shows that the aircraft is skidding. Movement in the opposite side (i.e. towards the left, same direction of turn) indicates that the aircraft is slipping. This enables the pilot to take corrective action. This is one of the necessary flight instruments.

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OP asked what to do. If indicator becomes unaligned with roll pointer, apply more rudder on the side where the indicator has moved. It's called, "stepping on the ball."

So if the slip/skid is right of the roll pointer, apply right rudder. If the indicator (a ball in the analog turn coordinator) is too far left, apply left rudder to force it back into alignment with the roll pointer.

This keeps the plane's nose pointing into the flight path, rather than to the inside or outside of the turn, which puts you at risk of stalling.

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  • $\begingroup$ Does being uncoordinated increase the risk of stalling? I know it increases the risk of a spin, should a stall occur. $\endgroup$ – Wayne Conrad Sep 20 '16 at 21:24
  • $\begingroup$ Yup. A sideslip increases the stall speed of the craft on top of the increase created by the bank. Added together, you can find yourself unexpectedly at stall speed. When an aircraft turns, a portion of the vertical component of lift is transferred to horizontal component of lift, drag increases and therefore the stall speed increases. Uncoordinated flight further increases the stall speed, which may bring the actual stall speed of the aircraft in that configuration dangerously close to the actual airspeed of the aircraft. downwindmag.com/2009/11/149 $\endgroup$ – Ron Craig Sep 20 '16 at 22:19
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According to this page on using the G1000:

Slip/Skid Indicator

The Slip/Skid Indicator is the small bar under the Roll Pointer. It moves away from the Roll Pointer to indicate slip or skid, just like the ball on a traditional Turn Coordinator.

enter image description here

So it's used exactly the same as the analog ball. If it's away from the roll pointer (out of center in analog), you're in a slip or a skid.

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On the B777, the only time I use it is during engine out maneuvers in the simulator.

It helps determine how much rudder trim should be used while operating with one engine.

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