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Does anyone know why EasyJet uses U2 as the prefix for flight numbers? Other airlines have more logical prefixes. Eg. KL -> KLM, AZ -> Alitalia, BA-> British Airways, etc. Even though they do not always match the airline name exactly, they do mimic the name.

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EZY(EasyJet UK) code and EZS(EasyJet Switzerland)are the ICAO codes, whereas U2 is the code generated by IATA.So the reason why they use the code U2 is because this is the code IATA generated for them when they applied for an IATA code.You can look at the document below that has to be submitted to IATA in order to get the code.

https://www.iata.org/services/Documents/codes-designator-form.pdf

http://www.easyjet.com/ejcms/cache/medialibrary/files/travel%20agent%20online%20guides/en/amadeus

EasyJet Airline Company Limited (UK Based) - (IATA code : U2 ; ICAO code EZY ; Callsign : Easy ) EasyJet Switzerland SA ( IATA code : DS ; ICAO code : EZS ; Callsign : TOPSWISS )

ICAO codes are used for operational purposes like flight planning,ATC etc whereas IATA codes like U2 are generally used in timetables, reservation systems, departure/arrival information etc. In other words information that is meant for the general public.

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Easyjet got their IATA code fairly late on, and as such could not use EZ (which was in use by Sun Air), so they were randomly issued their IATA code of U2.

They do have the three letter code of EZY, just as British Airways has BAW as well as BA.

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  • $\begingroup$ The 2 letter IATA code is the airline code. The flight callsign is the 3 letter code so Easyjet callsigns are "EZY321", pronounced "Easy 3-2-1". $\endgroup$ – Simon Nov 27 '15 at 16:28
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    $\begingroup$ The three letter code is the ICAO designation, and airlines are free to use either their two letter code or three letter code for call signs. British Airways uses "Speed Bird 123" as their call sign for most flights, and BA123 for the flight number. $\endgroup$ – Moo Nov 27 '15 at 16:55
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    $\begingroup$ I think you are wrong. Can you give any example of the the IATA code being using in a call sign? $\endgroup$ – Simon Nov 27 '15 at 21:27
  • $\begingroup$ @Moo, the call sign is written using the ICAO code on the flight plan, because flight plans are governed by ICAO. The spoken form uses a radiotelephony designator instead, which may not be related to either the code nor the airline name, as evidenced by BA's "Speedbird" and former PanAm's "Clipper". Note, that the call sign usually is the flight number, but not always. You can have flight BA123 with call sign BAW55B, which would then be spoken as "speedbird five five bravo". Also don't forget that these days most flights have more then one flight number due to code-sharing. $\endgroup$ – Jan Hudec Nov 30 '15 at 9:03

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