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Right now (26/11/2015, UTC 17:16), British Airways is flying over the Australian Outback with two Boeing 777-336(ER)s, christened flight BA15 (http://www.flightradar24.com/BAW15/8169bb5) and BA15X, which is slightly ahead (http://www.flightradar24.com/BAW15X/8169237).

Why is this? Is flight BA15X a logistic one? And if not, why did they use an "X" to distinguish between the two instead of another number?

EDIT

I am also wondering: is this going to cost extra money to BA, owing to the new slot they had to purchase or rent for operating a contemporary, second aircraft at SYD?

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    $\begingroup$ In the past, BA15X has been used to reposition aircraft after diversions or mechanical delays. See thebasource.com/… for an example. I suspect the X is used to differentiate it from the regularly scheduled flight operating at nearly the same time. Fascinating find. $\endgroup$ – user19474 Nov 26 '15 at 17:50
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The Wednesday flight was indeed delayed for a full day as was suggested in a comment.

enter image description here

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  • $\begingroup$ Is this going to cost extra money to BA, owing to the new slot they had to purchase or rent for operating a contemporary, second aircraft at SYD? $\endgroup$ – FaCoffee Nov 27 '15 at 9:45
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    $\begingroup$ It will cost extra money for the changed/additional slot at Heathrow, for sure. There may be costs at other airports. As to the aircraft, it depends whether BA had another suitable, unutilised aircraft available (this is a fairly quiet time of year, so it's not unreasonable to guess that BA may have had a spare at Heathrow...). But yes, this will (overall) have cost BA some money: any significant delay does $\endgroup$ – Jon Story Nov 27 '15 at 11:23

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