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A way to reduce the pressure drag of bluff bodies is to apply a tapering of the tail (so called boat tailing)

I know some (extreme) examples of this method of drag reduction applied to cars: enter image description here

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And I know that this a feature of the Very low drag bullet

enter image description here

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I was wondering if there are any aerospace applications?

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    $\begingroup$ I think the more difficult question to answer is "are there any aircraft that do not use this principle". I bet there are, but none spring to mind immediately... $\endgroup$ – Jay Carr Oct 1 '15 at 14:48
  • $\begingroup$ I understand that all aircraft shapes are aerodynamically shaped, but I'm looking for examples where a bluff body has a relatively small region that is tapered, rather than a teardrop shape as whole $\endgroup$ – ROIMaison Oct 1 '15 at 14:51
  • $\begingroup$ Planes with teardrop shape as a whole are very rare, because it is impractical. Anything that should have significant amount of internal space has constant cross-section for most length. $\endgroup$ – Jan Hudec Oct 1 '15 at 15:40
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Aerodynamic fairing fitted to the space shuttle for transport aboard NASA's 747 ferry aircraft

enter image description here

Although uncommon it has been used for aerodynamic and stealth reasons on fighters. An example is the chisel like engine enclosures on the YF-23 aircraft.

enter image description here

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This depends on the mission the plane is built to fit. Some planes need the cargo space so the tail is less tapered but most planes have at least some taper. Diamond Aircraft have very tapered tail sections

enter image description here (source)

Even the older GA designs like the Piper Seminole have a good deal of tail taper enter image description here (source)

Larger planes have some tail taper as well however sometimes there is less as there are often systems in the tail like the APU or there is storage space.

enter image description here (source)

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Almost all plane designs are made in wind tunnels and have a tapering empennage. Some notable exceptions which only taper in one dimension are rear-loading cargo planes like the C-130 and the Shorts Sky Van.

C-130 empennage Shorts Sky Van rear door

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    $\begingroup$ Your last two examples there are tapered, but only from one direction, which is actually fairly similar to the car posted in the question. $\endgroup$ – fooot Oct 1 '15 at 14:45
  • $\begingroup$ but it might just as well be tapered like that so the tail doesn't strike the runway on takeoff and landing. $\endgroup$ – rbp Oct 1 '15 at 15:30
  • $\begingroup$ It's more for cargo loading as your pictures illustrate well. $\endgroup$ – fooot Oct 1 '15 at 15:35
  • $\begingroup$ you don't need the taper for loading. its the lack of taper (as I mentioned in my answer) which is for loading $\endgroup$ – rbp Oct 1 '15 at 15:36
  • $\begingroup$ Lack of taper on one side, all taper on the other. $\endgroup$ – fooot Oct 1 '15 at 15:48

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