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The abbreviation for a condition of mist is BR on METAR and TAF reports. How did mist end up getting abbreviated as BR?

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According to a CFI's lesson plan on the internet, it comes from the French word for mist, brume.

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    $\begingroup$ I believe Smoke (FU) is also from the French (fumée) $\endgroup$
    – voretaq7
    Sep 25, 2015 at 22:27
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    $\begingroup$ The word "brouillard" would also fit and is more common, as far as I know. It's used on traffic signs in France. $\endgroup$
    – Hobbes
    Sep 26, 2015 at 10:50
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    $\begingroup$ Looked up the difference: brouillard is used when visibility is less than 1 km, brume is for visibility between 1 and 5 km. $\endgroup$
    – Hobbes
    Sep 26, 2015 at 11:52
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    $\begingroup$ "brume" is more used for mist while "brouillard" would be more often translated as fog (which would have reduced visibility). $\endgroup$ Sep 26, 2015 at 17:06
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    $\begingroup$ A useful mnemonic for BR is "baby rain". $\endgroup$
    – StephenS
    Dec 1, 2019 at 16:09

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