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From Aviation Herald, A320s have reported 6 issues in just last three days. What are some possible reasons for such bugs ,like AI 405 had a hydraulic leak, and B6-907 had a hydraulic failure. Are the airline engineering teams to be blamed for such incidents?

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closed as primarily opinion-based by Simon, fooot, Federico, CGCampbell, UnrecognizedFallingObject Sep 7 '15 at 19:15

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    $\begingroup$ Closing as primarily opinion based since numbers like this are meaningless without including what size is the total fleet, how many hours, MTBF and so on. BTW, hydraulic leaks are almost routine. Some aircraft are permanent flying hydraulic leaks. $\endgroup$ – Simon Sep 7 '15 at 17:54
  • $\begingroup$ see also: aviation.stackexchange.com/questions/19026 $\endgroup$ – Federico Sep 7 '15 at 18:00
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    $\begingroup$ It simply follows from the fundamental laws of nature that if you have independent, random incidents with uniform probability, the intervals between them will have exponential distribution, so it is absolutely normal that there are times when there is no incident and times when there are many in short time. You can't make any conclusions from that. $\endgroup$ – Jan Hudec Sep 8 '15 at 8:16
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A statement like "model X has reported Y failures in Z days" is not relevant in aviation. In aviation what is relevant is the mean time between failures [meaning the same type of failure] (in short MTBF): it is the mean time, fleet-wise, between two failures (example, two engine failure concerning the same component). The relevant part, is the "fleet-wise": if there would be only 1 A320 in operation, 2 issues a day would bee too many indeed, with hundreds (thousands?) of A320s in service, flying hundreds of hours each day all over the world, I would say that 2 issues a day is a quite decent record.

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    $\begingroup$ It is indeed thousands, by the way. 6,700 A320s have been delivered. Since deliveries only started in 1988, it's safe to assume the vast majority are still flying. Of civilian jet airliners, I think only the 737 has more deliveries (at about 8,600.) $\endgroup$ – reirab Sep 7 '15 at 19:55

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