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The classic book is awesome but I do know some of the terminology is outdated and perhaps some other things. Is there a site etc. that keeps track of what's outdated in the book "Stick and Rudder" and what the newest equivalent terms?

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I'm not aware of such a list although I would say 99.99% of this book is not outdated.

Maybe some of the terminology is outdated when it talks about the "gaits" of the aeroplane for example which is an horse term apparently.

I wouldn't say anything else is though certainly not the concepts, because the air is the same, the laws of physics are the same and human nature the same as it was 70 years ago. Its a very insightful book that should be every pilots reading.

Maybe it goes on more about tail-wheel aircraft and there are fewer of these aeroplanes around today but this only applies on the ground and is still very interesting even for nose dragger pilots like me.

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    $\begingroup$ I would say that it's precisely because tailwheel aircraft are now the "rare plane" on the flight line that those parts of Stick and Rudder are even more relevant today :) $\endgroup$ – voretaq7 Aug 27 '15 at 18:55
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    $\begingroup$ I know the concepts are fine but if there is any old terminology it would be good to know the modern version. 😊 $\endgroup$ – verve Aug 30 '15 at 18:21
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    $\begingroup$ What is "gaits" now called? $\endgroup$ – verve Aug 30 '15 at 18:22
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    $\begingroup$ By gait I think its a bit of an analogy that means mode of flight. There are eight gaits or modes that an aircraft flies in, with the horse it might be walk trot gallop with an aircraft these are level flight at high angle of attack, normal level flight, dive, normal glide, mushing glide, climb, stall, powered descent I think they were. $\endgroup$ – Philip Johnson Aug 31 '15 at 15:46
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    $\begingroup$ Thats my slang I think... However Stick and Rudder uses the term "Flippers" to refer to the elevators. When you read it, I think its fairly obvious what is old speak, most of it is the same as today, $\endgroup$ – Philip Johnson Sep 1 '15 at 19:02

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