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I'm looking for the lights and flashing patterns of the Airbus A340-313 (or any Airbus A340).

My question is related to this one: Do lights on aircraft flash in a specific pattern?

but is very specific for this model.

In any case I'll be grateful is there is some page or link with the patterns of several models (so I don't have to disturb you in the future :) )

Thanks in advance.

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    $\begingroup$ From this discussion on Airliners.net: "Airbus does have a synchronization between the strobe and the beacon lights. heres an example if what it looks like. 1=1st wing strobe - 2=2nd wing strobe - 3=beacon. 1.2..3..1.2..3..1.2..3..1.2..3 so on and so forth" $\endgroup$ – mins Jun 21 '15 at 22:45
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    $\begingroup$ Thanks mins! Also from that page is very interesting this part: Airbus uses a direction identification logic in their strobe lights. Forward facing strobes (left and right wingtip) double flash, whereas the rearward facing strobe is a single flashing unit. As a result you can identify whether the aircraft is coming towards you or away from you by the strobe flashes (double = towards you, single = away from you). $\endgroup$ – MacGyver Jun 21 '15 at 22:50
  • $\begingroup$ There is any consideration about the time? I'm trying to program a pic in order to simulate this effect in a model 1/144 $\endgroup$ – MacGyver Jun 21 '15 at 22:50
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    $\begingroup$ This other discussion helps but you'll need to use a watch to time the sequence. There are plenty of videos on YouTube which are usable. $\endgroup$ – mins Jun 21 '15 at 23:01
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    $\begingroup$ No need to use a 555 if you have a uC, you can use one of the GPIO for the whole sequence :) My comments are not complete enough to make a good answer, someone may provide all the element and a reference from Airbus documentation. Good luck! $\endgroup$ – mins Jun 21 '15 at 23:16
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For the lights on the A340-200/-300 see Documentation page 129.

For the lights on the A340-500/-600 see Documentation page 133.

Use the following link to see the lighting regulations for commercial aircraft - http://www.whelen.com/pb/Aviation/System%20Requirements/Anit-Collision%20Systems.pdf

Use of lights

AIM 4−3−23. Use of Aircraft Lights was updated in the latest edition.

Guidance about using aircraft lights during ground operations also appears in AC91-73B, “Part 91 and Part 135 Single-Pilot Procedures during Taxi Operations.”

h. Use of Exterior Aircraft Lights to Make Aircraft More Conspicuous.

(1) General. Exterior aircraft lights may be used to make an aircraft operating on the airport surface more conspicuous. Pilots may use various combinations of exterior lights to convey their location and intent to other pilots. Certain exterior lights may also be used in various combinations to signal whether the aircraft is on a taxiway or on a runway, in position on the runway but holding for takeoff clearance, crossing an active runway, or moving down the runway for takeoff.

NOTE: Because adherence to the guidelines in this AC are voluntary and aircraft equipment varies, pilots are cautioned not to rely solely on the status of an aircraft’s lights to determine the intentions of the pilot(s) of the other aircraft. Additionally, pilots must remember to comply with operating limitations on the aircraft’s lighting systems.

(2) Because adherence to the guidelines in this AC are voluntary and aircraft equipment varies, pilots are cautioned not to rely solely on the status of an aircraft’s lights to determine the intentions of the pilot(s) of the other aircraft. Additionally, pilots must remember to comply with operating limitations on the aircraft’s lighting systems.

(2) Exterior Lights. To the extent possible and consistent with aircraft equipage, operating limitations, and pilot procedures, pilots should illuminate exterior lights as follows:

(a) Engines Running. Turn on the rotating beacon whenever an engine is running.

(b) Taxiing. Prior to commencing taxi, turn on navigation, position, anti-collision, and logo lights, if available. To signal intent to other pilots, consider turning on the taxi light when the aircraft is moving or intending to move on the ground, and turning it off when stopped, yielding, or as a consideration to other pilots or ground personnel. Strobe lights should not be illuminated during taxi if they will adversely affect the vision of other pilots or ground personnel.

(c) Crossing a Runway. All exterior lights should be illuminated when crossing a runway. CAUTION: Pilots should consider any adverse effects to safety that illuminating the forward facing lights will have on the vision of other pilots or ground personnel during runway crossings.

(d) Entering the Departure Runway for Takeoff or LUAW. When entering a runway after being cleared for takeoff, or when taxiing into position and hold, pilots should make their aircraft more conspicuous to aircraft on final behind them and to ATC by turning on lights (except landing lights) that highlight the aircraft’s silhouette. Strobe lights should not be illuminated if they will adversely affect the vision of other pilots.

(e) At Night, and When Cleared to LUAW. Consider lining up slightly (approximately 3 feet) to the left or right of the centerline (CL) to enable a landing aircraft to visually differentiate your aircraft from the runway lights.

(f) Takeoff. Landing lights should be turned on when takeoff clearance is received, or when commencing takeoff roll at an airport without an operating control tower.

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  • $\begingroup$ thanks! that was I looking for, but links are forbidden or dead: The requested URL was rejected. Please consult with your administrator. $\endgroup$ – MacGyver Jun 21 '15 at 23:47

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