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I think there are multiple variants of engines for the different variants in B777 family but I am not sure but is it GE90-115B in one while Trent and PW in others?

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    $\begingroup$ An aircraft designer should consider at least 2 different engine suppliers per model/variant. To tie the aircraft to one supplier would create a monopoly which would enable them to charge what they liked. Also, buyers may have a preference for a specific engine supplier. $\endgroup$ – Level River St Jun 20 '15 at 0:04
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TL;DR: No.


For the true answer refer to the FAA Type Certificate Data Sheet

777-200

2 Pratt and Whitney Turbofan Model: PW4074, PW4074D, PW4077, PW4077D,PW4090,PW4084D, and PW4090-3 (Engine Type Certificate No. E46NE)

2 General Electric Turbofan Model: GE90-76B, GE90-85B, GE90-90B, GE90-94B (Engine Type Certificate No. E00049EN)

2 Rolls-Royce Turbofan Model: RB211-Trent 875-17, RB211-Trent, 877-17, RB211-Trent 884-17, RB211-Trent 892-17, or RB211 Trent 892B-17, RB211 Trent 895-17 (Engine Type Certificate E00050EN)

777-300

2 Rolls-Royce Turbofan Model: RB211-Trent 884-17, RB211-Trent 884B-17, or RB211-Trent 892-17 (Engine Type Certificate E00050EN)

2 Pratt & Whitney Turbofan Model: PW4090, PW4098 (Engine Type Certificate E46N)

777-300ER

2 General Electric Turbofan Model: GE90-115B (Engine Type Certificate No. E00049EN)

777-200LR

2 General Electric Turbofan Model: GE90-110B1

2 General Electric Turbofan Model: GE90-115B

(Engine Type Certificate No. E00049EN)

777F

2 General Electric Turbofan Model: GE90-110B1

2 General Electric Turbofan Model: GE90-115B (Engine Type Certificate No. E00049EN)

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From a related answer:

The Boeing 777-300ER is always equipped with General Electric GE90-115BL1 engines, while the baseline -300 can be ordered with four different engine models from General Electric, Pratt& Whitney or Rolls Royce. The Emirates Boeing 777-300 aircraft have the Rolls Royce RR Trent 892 engines installed. They deliver 415 kN of thrust, almost 100 kN less than the GE90-115BL1 engines.

When a customer orders a Boeing 777-300 they can pick their choice of the four engines available for that model. When they order a Boeing 777-300ER they will get the GE engine.

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  • $\begingroup$ So, airlines can order any aircraft with any compatible model? $\endgroup$ – NitinG Jun 19 '15 at 11:40
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    $\begingroup$ Basically yes. The manufacturer decides what engine models they support. The fewer models, the fewer cost for the manufacturer. But also less choice for the customer who might want to have an engine from a specific manufacturer. $\endgroup$ – DeltaLima Jun 19 '15 at 11:44
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    $\begingroup$ Note that according to Wikipedia, nobody has ordered a Boeing 777-300 since before 2006; the 777-300ER has effectively superseded it. $\endgroup$ – Nate Eldredge Jun 19 '15 at 15:28
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    $\begingroup$ @NitinG The -200 and -300 are no longer in production. AFAIK, the -200ER, -200LR, and -300ER (and the F) are still in production, but 100% of the outstanding orders for current models are for the -300ER or F. The -200, -200ER, and -300 were the first generation of 777s, while the -300ER and -200LR are the second generation. The most popular models, by far, were the -200ER from the first generation and the -300ER from the second generation. The next-generation 777 already has well more orders than the -200, -300, and -200LR put together and it's still a few years from production. $\endgroup$ – reirab Jun 19 '15 at 18:27
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Though @DeltaLima has already answered your question, I'd like to source my information from Wikipedia:

The following engine options are available for various 777 variants:

  1. 777-200 : PW4077 , RR877 , GE90-77B
  2. 777-200ER : PW 4090 , RR 895, GE90-94B
  3. 777-200LR : GE90-110B1 , GE90-115B1
  4. 777 Freighter: GE90-110B1 , GE90-115B1
  5. 777-300 : PW 4098 , RR 892 , GE90-92B/-94B
  6. 777-300ER : GE90-115B1
  7. 777-8X : GE9X
  8. 777-9X : GE9X
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    $\begingroup$ The Wikipedia page appears not to understand the engine naming systems used by the three companies. "GE90-xxx" and "PWxxxx" are correct, (apart from the erroneous spaces after "PW") but there is no such thing as an "RR877" etc. Presumably the page author didn't realize that PW and GE are not just abbreviations for the manufacturer's names, but part of the engine names themselves. Rolls-Royce engine names do not follow that system. $\endgroup$ – alephzero Jun 19 '15 at 13:55
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    $\begingroup$ Too late to edit my previous comment - a more correct "short" name for the RR engines would be Trent 877, Trent 895, etc., if it doesn't matter exactly which version of the 877 you are referring to. $\endgroup$ – alephzero Jun 19 '15 at 14:13
  • $\begingroup$ @alephzero You're right, of course, though I'm guessing Wiki put RR there for people not familiar enough with the manufacturers to know that Trent engines are made by RR. "RR Trent 877" would probably have been a more correct way to list it while still making the manufacturer obvious, though. It is Wiki... you could always just fix it. :) $\endgroup$ – reirab Jun 19 '15 at 18:32
  • $\begingroup$ Interestingly, as Sports Racer's answer notes, the GE90 isn't even listed as an engine option for the -300 on the 777 type certificate. The orders and deliveries page for the 777 on WIki also looks like only RR or P&W engines were ever ordered for it. $\endgroup$ – reirab May 19 at 5:39
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777-200-PW 4077 RR 877 GE90-77B 777-200ER-PW 4090 RR 895 GE90-94B 777-200Lr/freighter-GE90-110B1 GE90-115B1 777-300-PW 4098 RR 892 GE90-92B/-94B 777-300ER- GE90-115B1 777-8x/9x-GE9X link Got the information from wikipedia

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