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This is a follow-up to my previous question: What is ETOPS and how does it work? There is a related question here, but it does not specifically answer this new question.

Facts:

  • Since February 2015, all new aircraft are required to get ETOPS approval to fly ETOPS 180+ routes. Source.
  • The 747-8 has ETOPS 330. The 787 has ETOPS 330. The A350 has ETOPS 370.

Why does ETOPS not apply to the 747-400?

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  • $\begingroup$ Perhaps with the ever-increasing range of new aircraft it became more relevant... $\endgroup$ – Thunderstrike Jun 14 '15 at 12:22
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I think it's because the last 747-400 was built in 2009.

§121.162 ETOPS Type Design Approval Basis.

Except for a passenger-carrying airplane with more than two engines manufactured prior to February 17, 2015 and except for a two-engine airplane that, when used in ETOPS, is only used for ETOPS of 75 minutes or less, no certificate holder may conduct ETOPS unless the airplane has been type design approved for ETOPS and each airplane used in ETOPS complies with its CMP document as follows:

(a) For a two-engine airplane, that is of the same model airplane-engine combination that received FAA approval for ETOPS up to 180 minutes prior to February 15, 2007, the CMP document for that model airplane-engine combination in effect on February 14, 2007.

(b) For a two-engine airplane, that is not of the same model airplane-engine combination that received FAA approval for ETOPS up to 180 minutes before February 15, 2007, the CMP document for that new model airplane-engine combination issued in accordance with §25.3(b)(1) of this chapter.

(c) For a two-engine airplane approved for ETOPS beyond 180 minutes, the CMP document for that model airplane-engine combination issued in accordance with §25.3(b)(2) of this chapter.

(d) For an airplane with more than 2 engines manufactured on or after February 17, 2015, the CMP document for that model airplane-engine combination issued in accordance with §25.3(c) of this chapter.

§25.3 Special provisions for ETOPS type design approvals.

(a) Applicability. This section applies to an applicant for ETOPS type design approval of an airplane:

(1) That has an existing type certificate on February 15, 2007; or

(2) For which an application for an original type certificate was submitted before February 15, 2007.

(b) Airplanes with two engines. (1) For ETOPS type design approval of an airplane up to and including 180 minutes, an applicant must comply with §25.1535, except that it need not comply with the following provisions of Appendix K, K25.1.4, of this part:

(i) K25.1.4(a), fuel system pressure and flow requirements;

(ii) K25.1.4(a)(3), low fuel alerting; and

(iii) K25.1.4(c), engine oil tank design.

(2) For ETOPS type design approval of an airplane beyond 180 minutes an applicant must comply with §25.1535.

(c) Airplanes with more than two engines. An applicant for ETOPS type design approval must comply with §25.1535 for an airplane manufactured on or after February 17, 2015, except that, for an airplane configured for a three person flight crew, the applicant need not comply with Appendix K, K25.1.4(a)(3), of this part, low fuel alerting.

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  • $\begingroup$ Very interesting. That also means that the 747-8s built before February 17, 2015 are not required to comply with ETOPS. They must be slightly more valuable (than they would have been) as a result. $\endgroup$ – collector Jun 15 '15 at 18:53
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    $\begingroup$ In a lot of safety regulations (not just aviation) there is a concept of "grandfathering". Regulators want to tighten safety regulations but they feel that doing so for exiting vehicles would be an undue burden. $\endgroup$ – Peter Green Feb 9 '16 at 18:41

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