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Related to the question regarding pressure refuelling and this one regarding fuel vapors at large airports.

Refuelling an airplane involves putting fuel into tanks which are "empty" but are in fact full of dangerous air-fuel vapors. I do not believe many airplanes use "bladder" type flexible tanks which would avoid the creation of these airspaces.

When fuel goes in, the vapor has to go somewhere else. In contemporary cars, there is a vapor recovery both in the fuel system (activated carbon cylinder) as well as in the fuel nozzles.

If I understand both pressure refuelling as well as regular refuelling systems for airplanes and airliners, neither seem to have any sort of vapor recovery system. Wouldn't this be a considerable source of greenhouse gas emissions, let alone a tremendous fire hazard? Or is there a vapor recovery system being designed or implemented to mitigate this.

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You are correct on both your assumptions about the fuel vapour. It does have a greenhouse effect, though I would suspect that the amount of fuel required to make the air saturated in the fuel tank is not likely to be more than some tens of grams. It also presents a fire hazard.
However we again face the same issue as with many other systems that would be environment-friendly and safe: the cost.
Companies, both airlines and airport operators, carefully evaluate all cost to benefits. In this particular case the environmental effect is likely to be considered neglible, and the fire risk is tackled with other measures, such as grounding, clear-areas, ventilation etc. Those were covered nicely in the previous questions.

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