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Can one pilot lock the other out of the cockpit?

It is mentioned in the answer to the question I linked that a person inside the cockpit can stop a person outside from opening the door by "canceling the unlock process". This leads to several further questions:

  1. How exactly does the person on the inside "cancel the unlock process" (Press a button, flip a switch, enter "counter code", etc...)
  2. It seems there is a delay before the door opens. Is this correct? What's the duration of the delay?
  3. What are the "authority levels" of codes? Which levels exist, what do they mean?
  4. What is the confidentiality policy regarding those codes in theory and practice? (Who gets what authority level code officially? If stewards/stewardesses are not allowed to have the codes do pilots usually pass them on anyways?)
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    $\begingroup$ These sorts of questions would be difficult to answer without potentially exposing information which would compromise the very security measures you're asking about. (Not that security through obscurity / "It's safe because nobody ever talks about these things" is a good policy by any means, but the folks who have this information may be legally/contractually prohibited from sharing some of it.) $\endgroup$ – voretaq7 Mar 26 '15 at 22:44
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    $\begingroup$ Also, the whole idea of the locking cockpit door was to keep intruders (terrorists) from being able to force their way in. Either we keep everyone out, trusting those few needing in, or we don't. We cannot have it both ways. Do we trust the cabin crew with the codes? Mr. Hijacker points a gun at the head of a child and now what? $\endgroup$ – CGCampbell Mar 26 '15 at 22:49
  • $\begingroup$ @CGCampbell: How would that possibly work? If the cabin crew gives Mr. Hijacker the code then everyone is going to die, including the child... $\endgroup$ – Mehrdad Mar 27 '15 at 8:02
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    $\begingroup$ @Mehrdad historically speaking, most hijackers aren't set on suicide. If I were a cabin crew member, I'd much rather not know the code, than have to weigh up one definite death now versus X possible deaths later. $\endgroup$ – AakashM Mar 27 '15 at 9:24
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I'm going to explain this for the Airbus (also known as the Cockpit Door Locking System or CDLS):

  1. How exactly does the person on the inside "cancel the unlock process" (Press a button, flip a switch, enter "counter code", etc...)

    If the code is entered for an emergency external opening, the pilot has 30 seconds after the request period to toggle the door button to lock to deny the request or the door will unlock. It pops back the the 'Norm' position automatically.

  2. It seems there is a delay before the door opens. Is this correct? What's the duration of the delay?

    30 seconds, unless the lock button is pushed, in which case the request is inhibited for 5 minutes.

  3. What are the "authority levels" of codes? Which levels exist, what do they mean? What is the confidentiality policy regarding those codes in theory and practice? (Who gets what authority level code officially? If stewards/stewardesses are not allowed to have the codes do pilots usually pass them on anyways?)

    There are indeed two codes, but I believe the normal access one is optional. The (optional) normal code just chimes the cockpit for an opening request, while a secret code to the best of my knowledge is shared among the crew to request emergency access. "There are two different access request types : “Routine” and “Emergency” access request." These are however internal airline policies and differ from airline to airline, and I've read in some cases that they might even have the same emergency code across the fleet. In any case, the pilot(s) can still decline access.

gif

Here is a video about cockpit door as well.

Source, Page 37 onwards. While the source suggests that the time can be changed, most sources I've read refer to 5 minutes and 30 seconds as the standard times.

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    $\begingroup$ -1 for the gif. My eyes!!! (not really, but AARRGGHH!) $\endgroup$ – FreeMan Mar 26 '15 at 23:28

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