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On the Tulsa, Oklahoma VFR sectional the top of the outer Class C ring says "OBJECTIONABLE". Does this indicate some information on the chart is in dispute? I don't see anything in the VFR chart legend or side panels about the meaning.

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    $\begingroup$ It's highly unlikely that this designation has anything to do with Tulsa's class C. It's much more likely that it applies to one or more of the private fields (see here). $\endgroup$ – Pondlife Jan 23 '14 at 20:50
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    $\begingroup$ I object! This airspace is out of order and furthermore is antagonizing my Certification as a professional pilot! $\endgroup$ – user5644 Dec 27 '14 at 18:00
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It means that the airspace around the airport is still under review after a proposed change.

This article explains it in more detail: http://expertaviator.com/2012/07/31/what-is-an-objectionable-airport/

And here's the official text: Part 157

§157.7 FAA determinations. (a) The FAA will conduct an aeronautical study of an airport proposal and, after consultations with interested persons, as appropriate, issue a determination to the proponent and advise those concerned of the FAA determination. The FAA will consider matters such as the effects the proposed action would have on existing or contemplated traffic patterns of neighboring airports; the effects the proposed action would have on the existing airspace structure and projected programs of the FAA; and the effects that existing or proposed manmade objects (on file with the FAA) and natural objects within the affected area would have on the airport proposal. While determinations consider the effects of the proposed action on the safe and efficient use of airspace by aircraft and the safety of persons and property on the ground, the determinations are only advisory. Except for an objectionable determination, each determination will contain a determination-void date to facilitate efficient planning of the use of the navigable airspace. A determination does not relieve the proponent of responsibility for compliance with any local law, ordinance or regulation, or state or other Federal regulation. Aeronautical studies and determinations will not consider environmental or land use compatibility impacts.

(b) An airport determination issued under this part will be one of the following:

(1) No objection.

(2) Conditional. A conditional determination will identify the objectionable aspects of a project or action and specify the conditions which must be met and sustained to preclude an objectionable determination.

(3) Objectionable. An objectionable determination will specify the FAA's reasons for issuing such a determination.

(c) Determination void date. All work or action for which notice is required by this sub-part must be completed by the determination void date. Unless otherwise extended, revised, or terminated, an FAA determination becomes invalid on the day specified as the determination void date. Interested persons may, at least 15 days in advance of the determination void date, petition the FAA official who issued the determination to:

(1) Revise the determination based on new facts that change the basis on which it was made; or

(2) Extend the determination void date. Determinations will be furnished to the proponent, aviation officials of the state concerned, and, when appropriate, local political bodies and other interested persons.

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    $\begingroup$ In this case the culprit is OK94 ("Sand Ridge Airpark"), which has been deemed "Objectionable" because it conflicts with approaches to Tulsa International. $\endgroup$ – voretaq7 Jan 23 '14 at 20:48
  • $\begingroup$ I believe that your opening statement, It means that the airspace around the airport is still under review after a proposed change, is incorrect. I believe the label, OBJECTIONABLE, indicates that the FAA has made the airspace determination. $\endgroup$ – J Walters Feb 6 '16 at 19:32
  • $\begingroup$ @JonathanWalters Not quite. It's more like a hint to what the FAA wants to do with the airspace and the public can object to that preliminary decision. $\endgroup$ – Philippe Leybaert Sep 8 '16 at 23:40
  • $\begingroup$ @voretaq7: Seems like they've worked out their problems, since Sand Ridge no longer shows up on the sectional as "OBJECTIONABLE". $\endgroup$ – Sean May 8 at 3:58
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According to the FAA Aeronautical Navigation Products FAQ:

What does "OBJECTIONABLE" stand for on VFR Charts?

"OBJECTIONABLE" indicates an airspace determination per FAA Joint Order 7400.2J Section 4, Airport Charting and Publication of Airport Data, issued 9 FEB 2012. When you see this indication on a chart be sure to refer to the applicable Airport/Facility Directory for more information. FAA Regional Airports Offices are responsible for airspace determinations. Address any challenges to objectionable airspace determinations to your regional airports office.

FAA Joint Order 7400.2J Section 4 refers to Airport Airspace Analysis and says (emphasis added by me):

10−1−1. PURPOSE

a. This part provides guidelines, procedures, and standards that supplement those contained in 14 CFR part 157, Notice of Construction, Alteration, Activation, and Deactivation of Airports.

b. These guidelines, procedures, and standards must be used in determining the effect construction, alteration, activation, or deactivation of an airport will have on the safe and efficient use of the navigable airspace by aircraft.

10−4−1. POLICY

a. All landing facilities which have received airspace determinations or those not analyzed, must be properly documented and processed in accordance with procedures contained in FAAO 5010.4, Airport Safety Data Program.

b. Landing facilities that have received objectionable airspace determinations must be published in the NFDD as “objectionable.” They must be depicted on VFR aeronautical charts only and without identifying text other than to designate objectionable status. They must not be published in the Airport/Facility Directory (A/FD).

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