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What is the name of that big structure (in red) that holds the engine?

twin-engine aircraft

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    $\begingroup$ In English (and probably generally) "nacelle" is, basically, the word you're after $\endgroup$
    – Fattie
    Commented Jun 12 at 13:40

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The external part is called "engine nacelle". Internally there's the "engine nacelle structure"... and the engine itself obviously.

This is how it looks like for example in a Beechcraft Starship (cutaway source):

enter image description here

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  • $\begingroup$ I am not sure that piston aircraft, as shown in the question, have "nacelles". Generally, that term is used for gas turbine engines, such as the Starship, shown in this answer. But, the question showed a piston as an example. $\endgroup$
    – Adam
    Commented Jun 10 at 20:19
  • $\begingroup$ Mmh, cowling seems to be a more generic term used also for cars and bikes. But I'm not a native English speaker so I can't tell for sure the differences between the two terms $\endgroup$
    – sophit
    Commented Jun 10 at 20:39
  • $\begingroup$ The item shown in red does not support or contain that engine. It is just an outer skin that can be removed for doing maintenance. $\endgroup$
    – Adam
    Commented Jun 11 at 1:47
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    $\begingroup$ @Adam: This might actually be a good question for english.stackexchange.com As far as I understand it, cowling is the removable part while nacelle is the whole assembly. $\endgroup$
    – sophit
    Commented Jun 11 at 13:54
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    $\begingroup$ Nacelle is the correct term for any pod like engine enclosure such as this. A cowling just covers the engine and is usually used when an engine is faired into another structure like the fuselage. I'm not sure "engine nacelle structure" is a thing. A prop engine is usually held in place by an engine mount, a turbofan engine is held in place by a pylon. $\endgroup$
    – Pilothead
    Commented Jun 12 at 3:40
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What you have circled is the engine cowling. That doesn't hold the engine onto the wing, but instead is for aerodynamic purposes. The engine is connected to the wing with engine mounts that are not visible but would look something like this: Cessna 172 engine mount (although this example is for a different aircraft type)

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    $\begingroup$ The cowling is merely the skin of the nacelle. For engines mounted on the nose, there is no nacelle, but still a cowling. $\endgroup$
    – MikeB
    Commented Jun 11 at 8:17
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It depends on what you're asking for. The external structure structure you highlighted is the engine fairing. The Piper P-39 engines are mounted in engine bays:

enter image description here

P-39 engine bay, source: Flickr, by Errol Cavit.

On larger aircraft, each engine is fixed to a strut using engine mounts and thrust links. The strut is protected by a pylon fairing and part of the wing structure:

enter image description here

CFM56 and pylon, source.

The engine fairing, called a nacelle, contains more than the engine, e.g. the thrust reverser mechanism, separate from the engine and provided by the nacelle manufacturer, and the fan flow duct.


More:

How is a turboprop engine mounted to the wing?
How are engines mounted onto wings?
What are different components of an engine pylon?

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