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According to its Administrator Bill Nelson, NASA is working on a project with Boeing that will reduce single-isle aircraft fuel consumption by 30%. He described it as a higher and thinner wing and said...

will reduce fuel consumption by 30%.

and

you can get 30% combination between the engine and the wing.

I think that he's may be referring to the Boeing Truss-Braced Wing project.

My question is what portion of the anticipated fuel savings is directly attributable to the new wing design and what to the engine? Does the engine's contribution depend on the new wing design or will it happen regardless? Is the 30% reduction actually a realistic engineering expectation?

(Note: I've read other posts on this stackexchange about the same project but none of them answer my question.)

Update

I found a Jan 18th, 2023 NASA article about The Sustainable Flight Demonstrator. It said

NASA’s goal is that the technology flown on the demonstrator aircraft, when combined with other advancements in propulsion systems, materials, and systems architecture, would result in fuel consumption and emissions reductions of up to 30% relative to today’s most efficient single-aisle aircraft, depending on the mission.

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  • $\begingroup$ This should help. $\endgroup$
    – sophit
    Commented May 1 at 0:48
  • $\begingroup$ No, those answers don't talk about fuel efficiency other than referencing an aspiration of Boeing's (from 11 years ago) to reduce fuel consumption by 70% using multiple technologies. This answer and the subsequent discussion between sophit and @PeterKämpf is closer to the kind of answer I am hoping for. $\endgroup$
    – phil1008
    Commented May 1 at 18:19
  • $\begingroup$ Perhaps I should have said above, "style of answer I'm looking for". The referenced answer does not answer my question. $\endgroup$
    – phil1008
    Commented May 2 at 9:16
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    $\begingroup$ I streamlined the question and voted to reopen it 🖖 $\endgroup$
    – sophit
    Commented May 2 at 10:56
  • $\begingroup$ Thanks. Good edits! $\endgroup$
    – phil1008
    Commented May 2 at 17:47

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