1
$\begingroup$

After doing some initial research, it appears most GA piston engines have a recommended Time Between Overhaul of around 2,000 hours. I was wondering if there are any other engines that may have a significantly longer TBO. Do modern diesels developed from car engines such as the Austro E4 have longer TBOS due to their contemporary design, or are manufacturers hesitant to sign off on longer periods of operation?

$\endgroup$
2
  • $\begingroup$ A brief googling says the Austro E4 AE300's TBO is 1800 hours. Maybe the newer designs aren't newer in terms of metallurgy, lubrication, wear, fatigue and whatnot. $\endgroup$ Commented Apr 17 at 21:18
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ @CamilleGoudeseune They are newer, but the effort is going towards better power/weight ratio and better fuel efficiency, since these play more role in initial purchase decisions. $\endgroup$
    – Therac
    Commented Apr 21 at 8:42

1 Answer 1

1
$\begingroup$

For a private owner (part 91), TBO is not a legal requirement. It is a guideline. Anecdotal, I have heard from partnerships which fly on for 6,000 hours. If you know your engine, and you have a good mechanic, and do regular inspection to catch things, then you may get away with much longer intervals. It depends on the complexity of the engine, whether it is regularly inspected, whether various systems that do degrade such as pumps are replaced, and whether you have realtime diagnostics in the plane to catch problems. There are certain engines that are problematic, such as turbo charged, or geared engines. If it is your plane, you know your engine, you know the sound, or any vibration, and you also need a good mechanic, who can figure out compression, oil consumptions and other metrics to determine engine health.

$\endgroup$
2
  • 3
    $\begingroup$ Noting that TBO isn't binding for Part 91 doesn't really answer which engine has the longest published TBO. $\endgroup$
    – Ralph J
    Commented Apr 21 at 10:38
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ @Ralph J: No, but it does hint that the correct answer to OP's title question is "The one in sbrunner's plane." $\endgroup$ Commented Apr 22 at 1:19

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .