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We've all seen the problem passengers that behave so poorly that they have to be deplaned from the flight. I think that most are not criminally prosecuted (but I could be wrong) so my question surrounds what actions the airline(s) take. Specifically, does the airline put Johnny on a "no-fly" list forever, and is this info shared with/enforced by other airlines and/or TSA?

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    $\begingroup$ Whoever voted to close this for being "unrelated to aviation" is higher than airborne planes! $\endgroup$ Commented Feb 25 at 15:41

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There is such a wide range of "it depends on the circumstances" (and the country you're in, and the airline you're on, and the individuals involved) that no single answer is going to always apply.

In the most simple case of a passenger who's had too much to drink and complies when they're told to deplane, it's possible that they have no greater punishment than a few hours to sober up watching airport TV (which is, admittedly, pretty bad), and once they have sobered up, they might be on a later flight.

On the other end of the scale, the utterly noncompliant passenger who decides to fight with law enforcement officers after attacking people on the airplane and damaging the aircraft itself is going to be in a world of trouble.

And everything in between can have outcomes in between.

Me personally, I've had several cases of deplaning intoxicated customers, most of whom left uneventfully. (I was no longer around that airport to know if they got on a later flight or not.) I've also had cases where law enforcement met us in the jetway, and I can think of two offhand where an arrest was a very real possibility. In one case, after what was apparently a pretty lengthy interview, the police decided to let the guy go; in the other, the perp absolutely should have gone to jail, and that only didn't happen because the step-father meeting his kids' flight declined to press charges. My opinion of him was almost as low as my opinion of the offender.

As far as airline no-fly lists, those do exist, but what exactly it takes to get on one is beyond what we as pilots typically see.

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  • $\begingroup$ The no-fly list was what I was particularly interested in. I was wondering how long an offender would be on it and how does that interrelate with other carriers/TSA. $\endgroup$
    – RetiredATC
    Commented Feb 25 at 5:50

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