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I know that some military transport aircraft share the same engine as civilian aircraft, e.g., the TF39 used in C-5A was called CF6 in the civilian market.

When the manufacturer makes the plane, do the engines they procure for military aircraft come from the same production line as the civilian engines or do they establish separate lines and manufacturing/certification processes?

My question was connected to what engine procurement for the Embraer C390 would look like. It uses the V2500-E5 engine, which is almost the same as the popular V2500-A5 engine.

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Usually what you see is the "civilianized" version of the military engine has been modified to achieve cost improvements or maintainability improvements.

For example, the military version may come as a left hand and right hand engine right up to the complete assembly (engine build unit), making the engines mirror images of each other.

For the civilian version, this is a big hassle because an engine spares stock needs to include a minimum number of left and right engines. Way less spares stock is needed if the engine build unit is universal, so you will see the engines with as many components as possible mounted all the same way, and left right accommodations are incorporated at the late stage of the build, or in the interface with the aircraft.

So the military version might have a component that points left for the left side engine and right for the right side engine, whereas for the civilian version, all of the engines have that component on the left side, and the extra plumbing is designed into the aircraft interface to accommodate mounting the engine on the opposite side.

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