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I am thinking about getting PPL as a base step for pilot career. But all my previous life experience tells me that without practice, any skills would decrease rapidly with time.

I have a sum of money not enough to pay for whole CPL training, but enough to pay for PPL training and to buy a used plane for a price, say, 30000$. I understand that that would be very old and primitive plane. But would this be a good investment if I wants to fly for increase my flight hours after training and do some activities, for example, to make money through flight blogging on YouTube?

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    $\begingroup$ It depends on way too many factors to be answered here. I think the better and much safer option would be to consult someone experienced and do your own research (better to trust yourself than someone on the internet). $\endgroup$ Dec 25, 2023 at 13:35
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    $\begingroup$ Well, my question is the first step of such research. $\endgroup$ Dec 25, 2023 at 14:08
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    $\begingroup$ not the best place... $\endgroup$ Dec 25, 2023 at 14:33

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Training is hard on engines, and it's a good idea to wait until you know you have a license before becoming an owner, so do your Private on a flying school's airplane so it gets beaten like a mule and not your pride and joy, then advertise for a partner or two to acquire something to build time in, and pool your money to find the best example you can, of an airplane that is easy to sell.

The used plane has the potential to be a money pit. On the other hand it's worth doing if you can spread the cost and get the right airplane. Buy a nicer one, like an old but really pristine C-150 or 172, with 1 or 2 partners, and create a micro-flying club. More than 2 partners, 3 owners total, the benefit of the cost dilution is not worth the hassles of "shared custody", but 1 or 2 partners works well for the right people.

With your fixed costs diluted by 1/2 or 2/3rds, the expenses that come up won't be anywhere near as painful. The financial pain from the maintenance/insurance/tie down or hangar bills kills the fun, so it's important to get the costs down to a level that doesn't bother you or force you to make major sacrifices in other areas and you can enjoy flying the hell out of the thing to build hours and go on to commercial.

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  • $\begingroup$ How do you distribute costs among the 2 or 3 owners? In a fair and legally sound way. $\endgroup$
    – Michael
    Dec 25, 2023 at 20:53
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    $\begingroup$ @Michael I did the finances for a small 1 a/c club a number of years ago. We charged monthly dues to cover the fixed expenses. Aircraft loan, hangar, insurance, nav data base subscription and annual inspection all fall under this. Then you charge each member an hourly rate for using the a/c. The rate has to cover operating driven costs; fuel, oil, routine maintenance, and an engine reserve to pay for the overhaul ($15/hr will cover a $30k o/h at 2000 hrs.) At the time, it came to about $20k/yr total for about 200 flying hours-half fixed and half operating expenses (a/c was paid for.) $\endgroup$
    – Gerry
    Dec 26, 2023 at 0:16
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    $\begingroup$ @Gerry I had a share in a syndicate with 3 C-180s on floats in the late 70s/early80s. 15 members were shareholders in a numbered company that owned the planes. and we rented them from the numbered company at a wet rate of around 38/hr. About 120/hr today. Plus a few grand a year as a share of insurance and docking etc. About the cheapest way there was to accumulate float time. You mentioned overhaul: Plan for 2000hrs, but Savvy Aviation has a podcast where he talks about a micro club that got 5500 hours out of its O-360 before it was finally pulled for oil consumption. $\endgroup$
    – John K
    Dec 26, 2023 at 1:34

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