18
$\begingroup$

I was curious what this little extra surface on the back of the F-22 is for. I can't see any use of it protruding past the engine nozzles, so what is it for? Also, does the structure have any problems with heating, being right beside the engines? (Especially with the afterburner on)

enter image description here

$\endgroup$
4

3 Answers 3

37
$\begingroup$

According to this cutaway (source) it is a "runaway emergency arrest hook housing":

F-22 cutaway

$\endgroup$
0
15
$\begingroup$

It is the tailhook housing. Looking for a definitive picture, but can't find one.

$\endgroup$
4
  • $\begingroup$ but I thought the F-22 wasn't meant to be operated on carriers, or any situations needing a tailhook. Is it a backup then for emergencies? $\endgroup$
    – Wyatt
    Commented Nov 20, 2023 at 2:53
  • 9
    $\begingroup$ @Wyatt - Yes, emergencies. Hooks aren't just for carriers. Most (All?) USAF fighters have a hook, F-15, -16, etc. And the runways have a cable at each end. $\endgroup$
    – WPNSGuy
    Commented Nov 20, 2023 at 2:57
  • $\begingroup$ I believe that was something that started being used with the Air Force version of the F-4. $\endgroup$
    – Davidw
    Commented Nov 22, 2023 at 18:00
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ @Davidw - No, before then. The F-100 had an emer arresting hook as well. $\endgroup$
    – WPNSGuy
    Commented Nov 22, 2023 at 21:44
9
$\begingroup$

While the cutaway drawing shows that Stinger described as an enclosure for the runaway arrestor hook, close-up inspection of an F-22 aft section reveals that is only partly true.

enter image description here enter image description here

The runaway arrester hook is located in a low RCS blister pod just under that structure.

If you take a look at the aft end of an F119 engine removed from the airplane, you see quite a bit of structure surrounding the jet pipe. This contains the actuation equipment for the thrust vectoring paddles.

enter image description here

I would argue that the little ‘stinger’ is more likely an aerodynamic closeout or similar structure between the two engines once they are installed in the airplane.

$\endgroup$
3
  • 2
    $\begingroup$ I strongly support this answer, the tailhook has its own housing below the "stinger. I would add that the stinger (obviously) also has the function of controlling radar reflections. The center stinger is clearly split, this would suggest is may hold some active components. It is worth noting that publicly availlable information about F-22 is very limited for obvious reasons. The fact that the stinger is officially listed as tailhook housing absolutely does not mean it actually is only that. $\endgroup$
    – Jpe61
    Commented Jan 8 at 7:02
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ Judging by the signature on the illustration, it appears to have been done in 1997. That was the year the production F-22A was publicly rolled out and it’s unclear where the artist obtained the information for all of the details shown. It’s possible he was employed by Lockheed and got it that way, but did not go into depth on this section of the a/c, or simply could not show it due to perspective, etc. $\endgroup$ Commented Jan 8 at 14:59
  • $\begingroup$ Btw, i think the two first images are 3D-models, not actual aircraft. Not that it would make too much difference since they are very high quality. $\endgroup$
    – Jpe61
    Commented Jan 8 at 16:56

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .