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Let us consider an aircraft(A) with 16000 ft maximum altitude limit. Above which it cannot achieve 0.25 G vertical acceleration with 1500 FPM. Now, my question is if there is an aircraft(B) flying in an altitude like 16200 ft above our aircraft(A), does the TA advisory will be generated or not. What will be the TA range limit of our aircraft(A) to consider the aircraft(B) as a TA advisory threat above the maximum altitude limit. How to calculate the TA range limit?

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    $\begingroup$ Please consider which uses of "TA" in your post should be revised to the acronym of a different advisory. The dynamics you're talking about may be used in TCAS, but not with respect to TA's. $\endgroup$
    – Ralph J
    Oct 9, 2023 at 1:56
  • $\begingroup$ Yes I'm talking about the TA and RA advisories given by TCAS II System of an aircraft. $\endgroup$
    – Vignesh V
    Oct 9, 2023 at 4:13
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    $\begingroup$ Consider the difference between what a TA tells the crew, and what an RA tells the crew. Performance plays no role in presenting a TA. In fact, a TA is generated even without an altitude for the target. Having altitude on the target might suppress the TA if vertical separation is great enough, but that's it. $\endgroup$
    – Ralph J
    Oct 9, 2023 at 17:04

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It does not factor in. Why would it? The lower aircraft does not know the higher aircraft's intentions, and an aircraft passing 200 feet above is definitely a threat. The higher aircraft does not know the lower aircraft's performance numbers.

Two aircraft within 200 feet of each other are a collision risk if their horizontal paths are converging, and a traffic advisory and then a resolution advisory will be issued as the convergence becomes imminent.

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