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This is the manifest for my grandaunt (she is #9). She most likely took a train from Paris to Croatia to visit her mother. The family was not wealthy, so this was an extravagant expense for them.

Can the plane type be determined from the flight information? Maybe a Lockheed L-1049.

Passenger manifest for TWA flight 934 on June 13th 1954 from New York to Paris

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    $\begingroup$ I wonder if we have any info on how much did such a plane ticket cost in 1954. Interesting document for sure! $\endgroup$
    – Neinstein
    Sep 7, 2023 at 16:29
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    $\begingroup$ @Neinstein - I have looked for ticket costs, no success so far. I am also trying to determine how much her husband made. He was an assistant foreman in a coal mine in SW Pennsylvania. $\endgroup$
    – Mattman944
    Sep 8, 2023 at 15:34
  • $\begingroup$ Isn't there a chance the first digit is actually a 7? Making it N6074C? $\endgroup$ Sep 9, 2023 at 17:02
  • $\begingroup$ @GrzegorzOledzki I don't think so, it looks like a typewriter-style 1 for me: imgur.com/a/E2ubH8L $\endgroup$
    – Neinstein
    Sep 11, 2023 at 5:58

1 Answer 1

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It's a Lockheed L-749A Constellation: You can tell by looking at the "N" number on the rear portion of the fuselage, and matching that with the "N" number shown on the passenger manifest. (N6014C)

(NOTE: The "N" number N6014C is currently assigned to a Cessna 182)

By the way, the L-1049 (Super Constellation) was a longer version and evolved from the L-749.

enter image description here

enter image description here

(Source)

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    $\begingroup$ A picture of the exact plane, more than I expected! Thx. $\endgroup$
    – Mattman944
    Sep 6, 2023 at 22:46
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    $\begingroup$ @sophit something's not right about that data, I clicked on the registration info link and it's all about a Cessa 182, are N numbers reused? $\endgroup$
    – Gaston
    Sep 7, 2023 at 14:55
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    $\begingroup$ @Gaston Searching a bit on this site, it looks like the numbers can be reused after being deregistered for 5 years. $\endgroup$ Sep 7, 2023 at 15:01
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    $\begingroup$ @sophit The flight you mention in your comment above appears to apply to the Cessna 182 that currently is registered as N6014C. $\endgroup$
    – user22445
    Sep 7, 2023 at 15:49
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    $\begingroup$ @sophit From my "Source" reference (AirHistory.net) N6014C is a historical airplane worthy of addition to the site (and an image of it exists). From the "Flight Aware" site, for example, it (the L749) is probably the only picture still available online that gets (probably) automatically uploaded because it's available online. I believe most airplanes registered would not be shown unless there was a image with an associated "N" number existing online somewhere. $\endgroup$
    – user22445
    Sep 7, 2023 at 17:51

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