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Can you explain what the 2nd caution on the LTAF VOR A chart means? "2. IF THE AIRCRAFT WILL MAKE A CIRCLING APPROACH VIA RIGHT TURN, ATC SHALL BE INFORMED AS SOON AS POSSIBLE." What exactly does this expression mean? I couldn't understand the use of "right turn" in particular. Because, although our main approach procedure is VOR A approach, is it meant to be described as a "Circling Approach" carried out from the north of the aerodrome? We see that the minimum value is also given as a circling, not a straight-in approach. Is this the 2nd caution written by considering VOR A approach as circling approach, or only the minimum value of VOR A approach is given as circling, and in fact, circling approach and VOR A approach are completely different things? I would appreciate it if you explain clearly by comparing the terms VOR A, circling approach, minimum value, and right turn. Here is the chart: enter image description here

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    $\begingroup$ Have you asked any local pilots or ATC how this is expected to be flown? Because I'm stumped why you would not be able to land straight ahead on a course of 228. (although the base question about the warning is clear enough.) $\endgroup$ Sep 4, 2023 at 17:56
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    $\begingroup$ @MichaelHall There is a question on that topic here. There is a 591' obstacle just south of the extended certerline between the MAP and the runway threshold. This prevents a straight-in minimum from being published, but as far as I understand it doesn't prevent the pilot from landing straight-in if they have runway 23 in sight and can land safely. $\endgroup$
    – Chris
    Sep 4, 2023 at 18:06
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    $\begingroup$ This is where I think speaking with local pilots and ATC would be most helpful. I think that they cannot publish straight in minimums due to violating obstacle clearance rules. But perhaps as long as you are visual and call it a "circling" you're legal to fly and land straight ahead? $\endgroup$ Sep 4, 2023 at 22:01
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    $\begingroup$ For any procedural questions, here or with local pilots or ATC, you should specify the landing runway. $\endgroup$ Sep 5, 2023 at 15:22
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    $\begingroup$ @pilot162 As long as you stay within protected airspace, don't go south of the aerodrome, and don't descend below MDA until you need to to make a normal descent for landing, you can fly it however you like. Note that the 228 course puts you on the upwind leg for 23- if you are landing 23 and the visibility is good enough, you can fly over the aerodrome then turn right crosswind and just fly basically a normal VFR pattern. $\endgroup$
    – Chris
    Sep 5, 2023 at 16:32

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It means plainly what it says. A right turn is when you turn to the right. If you are going to make a right turn, you need to tell ATC as soon as possible that you are planning to do that. Since you are not authorized to turn left (as that takes you south of the aerodrome), this means you must notify ATC if you are not going to land straight-in.

Your related question asks why this has no straight-in minimums published. The reason is that there is an obstacle just south of the extended centerline in between the missed approach point and the runway threshold. This prevents straight-in minimums from being published. It does not prevent the pilot from flying straight-in if they have the runway in sight and have sufficient time to make a normal approach for landing.

In other words, this is an approach where they want you to approach runway 23 straight-in, but they can't promise you the obstacle protection that they would need to for a straight-in approach. So they give you circling minimums and ask you to land straight-in if you can.

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  • $\begingroup$ I'm writing to make sure I understand correctly: The circling approach maneuver we call "Right Turn" is the maneuver we decided to make a circle to land while approaching runway 23 on the 228° course, and because it is prohibited in the south of the aerodrome, we turn right and turn to the north of the aerodrome, right? Because the maneuver in which we turn left and move away from the VOR on the 030° course might also mean the term "Right Turn" if they consider the approach type we call VOR A as a circling approach? (Because the minimum is given as a circling, not a straight-in approach)@Chris $\endgroup$
    – pilot162
    Sep 4, 2023 at 18:38
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    $\begingroup$ @pilot162 A "right turn" is when you turn to the right. If you turn left, that's a "left turn." For instance, you could overfly the field and then turn right to make right traffic for 23. You have to tell ATC if you're going to do this. Or you can just land straight-in on the 228° course for runway 23 without turning at all. You don't need to tell ATC if you are doing this, implying it's what ATC is assuming you will do. In other words, this is technically a circling approach but it doesn't actually want you to turn unless you need to. $\endgroup$
    – Chris
    Sep 4, 2023 at 18:47
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    $\begingroup$ From the 228° course a left turn is prohibited since it takes you south of the aerodrome. A right turn is allowed but you need to inform ATC. But you can also land without turning at all. This would look a lot like a straight-in approach, but because of the obstacles it is legally a circling approach. $\endgroup$
    – Chris
    Sep 4, 2023 at 18:48
  • $\begingroup$ Your last comment you added to your answer was exactly the answer I was looking for, thank you. Also, I would like to ask, wouldn't it be possible procedurally if the minimum value of 1200 feet was given as the straight-in approach value (as the name) and the missed approach point was before the obstacle on the approach line exactly at 8 DME? Thus, since 1200 feet is the minimum, a straight-in approach could be applied if there is a runway view before the obstacle at this altitude and at 8DME. (The issue is just not giving the name straight-in approach.) @Chris $\endgroup$
    – pilot162
    Sep 5, 2023 at 7:56

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