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Both are ILS approaches. In Jeppesen introduction there's a similar icon which is explained as "A "broken" navaid or fix symbol indicates that it does not fall directly in line with final approach track." but both the symbol and the explanation don't match some of the navaid symbols I see.

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    $\begingroup$ Would you post the name of the airport associated with the approaches? $\endgroup$
    – user22445
    Jul 31 at 19:47
  • $\begingroup$ @RTO LTBY Hasan Polatkan with the cut cone and LTBZ Zafer with the full cone $\endgroup$
    – Kerem Kaya
    Jul 31 at 19:52

1 Answer 1

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The LTBY ILS RWY 09 (rwy course is 088 degrees) shows a "broken VOR navaid" symbol (definition shown in your question). This is because if you navigate outbound (beginning the approach) from ESR VOR and turn inbound you then join the ILS localizer (IESR), which is a final approach course of 088 degrees. Once you join the IESR localizer you are no longer using the VOR for course information. If you were flying direct to the VOR you would be on a course of 084 degrees (as published on the VOR DME RWY 09 approach). So, the VOR symbol is "broken" indicating "...that it does not fall directly in line with final approach track." (Note the location of the VOR on the "plan view" in relationship to the runway)

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The LTBZ ILS RWY 13 (rwy course is 127 degrees) shows an "unbroken VOR navaid" symbol. This is because when you complete your outbound navigation and turn inbound the ILS localizer course and VOR course are the same (127 degrees). Therefore, the VOR course falls "...directly in line with final approach track." (Note the location of the VOR on the "plan view" in relationship to the runway)

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(emphasis shown on all images above is mine. Approach plate images are for illustration purposes only and not to be used for navigation)

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