The Stack Overflow podcast is back! Listen to an interview with our new CEO.
4 typo
source | link

Just off the top of my head,

  • It would take up space that could be used for three or four paying passengers. This would result in increased ticket prices for everybody and the non-smoking majority have no incentive to subsidise a smoking cubicle.

  • It would require a ventillationventilation system that would prevent smoky air from getting into the rest of the cabin, which would add weight and complexity.

  • It's a fire risk and a small fire from some idiot disposing of paper in the ashtray could spread; it would be hard to detect such a fire early because you couldn't just put a smoke detector in the smoking cubicle. (I guess an infra-red detector would work.)

  • Almost nobody tries to smoke in the lavatory so reducing the occurrence of an event that hardly ever happens isn't worth much.

  • Rates of smoking are decreasing in most Western countries, so demand for such a cubicle is already falling.

  • Anti-smoking legislation is often aimed at worker protection: who's going to clean the smoking cubicle and what equipment will they need?

  • I doubt there's significant pressure, even from smokers, for such a service to be provided.

Just off the top of my head,

  • It would take up space that could be used for three or four paying passengers. This would result in increased ticket prices for everybody and the non-smoking majority have no incentive to subsidise a smoking cubicle.

  • It would require a ventillation system that would prevent smoky air from getting into the rest of the cabin, which would add weight and complexity.

  • It's a fire risk and a small fire from some idiot disposing of paper in the ashtray could spread; it would be hard to detect such a fire early because you couldn't just put a smoke detector in the smoking cubicle. (I guess an infra-red detector would work.)

  • Almost nobody tries to smoke in the lavatory so reducing the occurrence of an event that hardly ever happens isn't worth much.

  • Rates of smoking are decreasing in most Western countries, so demand for such a cubicle is already falling.

  • Anti-smoking legislation is often aimed at worker protection: who's going to clean the smoking cubicle and what equipment will they need?

  • I doubt there's significant pressure, even from smokers, for such a service to be provided.

Just off the top of my head,

  • It would take up space that could be used for three or four paying passengers. This would result in increased ticket prices for everybody and the non-smoking majority have no incentive to subsidise a smoking cubicle.

  • It would require a ventilation system that would prevent smoky air from getting into the rest of the cabin, which would add weight and complexity.

  • It's a fire risk and a small fire from some idiot disposing of paper in the ashtray could spread; it would be hard to detect such a fire early because you couldn't just put a smoke detector in the smoking cubicle. (I guess an infra-red detector would work.)

  • Almost nobody tries to smoke in the lavatory so reducing the occurrence of an event that hardly ever happens isn't worth much.

  • Rates of smoking are decreasing in most Western countries, so demand for such a cubicle is already falling.

  • Anti-smoking legislation is often aimed at worker protection: who's going to clean the smoking cubicle and what equipment will they need?

  • I doubt there's significant pressure, even from smokers, for such a service to be provided.

3 Rollback to Revision 1
source | link

Just off the top of my head,

  • It would take up space that could be used for three or four paying passengers. This would result in increased ticket prices for everybody and the non-smoking majority have no incentive to subsidizesubsidise a smoking cubicle.

  • It would require a ventilationventillation system that would prevent smoky air from getting into the rest of the cabin, which would add weight and complexity.

  • It's a fire risk and a small fire from some irresponsibleidiot disposing of paper in the ashtray could spread; it would be hard to detect such a fire early because you couldn't just put a smoke detector in the smoking cubicle. (I guess an infra-red detector would work.)

  • Almost nobody tries to smoke in the lavatory so reducing the occurrence of an event that hardly ever happens isn't worth much.

  • Rates of smoking are decreasing in most Western countries, so demand for such a cubicle is already falling.

  • Anti-smoking legislation is often aimed at worker protection: who's going to clean the smoking cubicle and what equipment will they need?

  • I doubt there's significant pressure, even from smokers, for such a service to be provided.

Just off the top of my head,

  • It would take up space that could be used for three or four paying passengers. This would result in increased ticket prices for everybody and the non-smoking majority have no incentive to subsidize a smoking cubicle.

  • It would require a ventilation system that would prevent smoky air from getting into the rest of the cabin, which would add weight and complexity.

  • It's a fire risk and a small fire from some irresponsible disposing of paper in the ashtray could spread; it would be hard to detect such a fire early because you couldn't just put a smoke detector in the smoking cubicle. (I guess an infra-red detector would work.)

  • Almost nobody tries to smoke in the lavatory so reducing the occurrence of an event that hardly ever happens isn't worth much.

  • Rates of smoking are decreasing in most Western countries, so demand for such a cubicle is already falling.

  • Anti-smoking legislation is often aimed at worker protection: who's going to clean the smoking cubicle and what equipment will they need?

  • I doubt there's significant pressure, even from smokers, for such a service to be provided.

Just off the top of my head,

  • It would take up space that could be used for three or four paying passengers. This would result in increased ticket prices for everybody and the non-smoking majority have no incentive to subsidise a smoking cubicle.

  • It would require a ventillation system that would prevent smoky air from getting into the rest of the cabin, which would add weight and complexity.

  • It's a fire risk and a small fire from some idiot disposing of paper in the ashtray could spread; it would be hard to detect such a fire early because you couldn't just put a smoke detector in the smoking cubicle. (I guess an infra-red detector would work.)

  • Almost nobody tries to smoke in the lavatory so reducing the occurrence of an event that hardly ever happens isn't worth much.

  • Rates of smoking are decreasing in most Western countries, so demand for such a cubicle is already falling.

  • Anti-smoking legislation is often aimed at worker protection: who's going to clean the smoking cubicle and what equipment will they need?

  • I doubt there's significant pressure, even from smokers, for such a service to be provided.

2 Fixed spelling mistakes and removed offensive reference to idiots. They have rights too.
source | link

Just off the top of my head,

  • It would take up space that could be used for three or four paying passengers. This would result in increased ticket prices for everybody and the non-smoking majority have no incentive to subsidisesubsidize a smoking cubicle.

  • It would require a ventillationventilation system that would prevent smoky air from getting into the rest of the cabin, which would add weight and complexity.

  • It's a fire risk and a small fire from some idiotirresponsible disposing of paper in the ashtray could spread; it would be hard to detect such a fire early because you couldn't just put a smoke detector in the smoking cubicle. (I guess an infra-red detector would work.)

  • Almost nobody tries to smoke in the lavatory so reducing the occurrence of an event that hardly ever happens isn't worth much.

  • Rates of smoking are decreasing in most Western countries, so demand for such a cubicle is already falling.

  • Anti-smoking legislation is often aimed at worker protection: who's going to clean the smoking cubicle and what equipment will they need?

  • I doubt there's significant pressure, even from smokers, for such a service to be provided.

Just off the top of my head,

  • It would take up space that could be used for three or four paying passengers. This would result in increased ticket prices for everybody and the non-smoking majority have no incentive to subsidise a smoking cubicle.

  • It would require a ventillation system that would prevent smoky air from getting into the rest of the cabin, which would add weight and complexity.

  • It's a fire risk and a small fire from some idiot disposing of paper in the ashtray could spread; it would be hard to detect such a fire early because you couldn't just put a smoke detector in the smoking cubicle. (I guess an infra-red detector would work.)

  • Almost nobody tries to smoke in the lavatory so reducing the occurrence of an event that hardly ever happens isn't worth much.

  • Rates of smoking are decreasing in most Western countries, so demand for such a cubicle is already falling.

  • Anti-smoking legislation is often aimed at worker protection: who's going to clean the smoking cubicle and what equipment will they need?

  • I doubt there's significant pressure, even from smokers, for such a service to be provided.

Just off the top of my head,

  • It would take up space that could be used for three or four paying passengers. This would result in increased ticket prices for everybody and the non-smoking majority have no incentive to subsidize a smoking cubicle.

  • It would require a ventilation system that would prevent smoky air from getting into the rest of the cabin, which would add weight and complexity.

  • It's a fire risk and a small fire from some irresponsible disposing of paper in the ashtray could spread; it would be hard to detect such a fire early because you couldn't just put a smoke detector in the smoking cubicle. (I guess an infra-red detector would work.)

  • Almost nobody tries to smoke in the lavatory so reducing the occurrence of an event that hardly ever happens isn't worth much.

  • Rates of smoking are decreasing in most Western countries, so demand for such a cubicle is already falling.

  • Anti-smoking legislation is often aimed at worker protection: who's going to clean the smoking cubicle and what equipment will they need?

  • I doubt there's significant pressure, even from smokers, for such a service to be provided.

1
source | link