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A big benefit of swept wings is lower drag at high speed. When an aircraft with swept wings yaws, it is effectively increasing the sweep of the wing in the direction of the yaw, and decreasing the sweep of the other wing. So the wing opposite the direction of yaw will have less sweep, therefore more drag, counteracting the yaw. Likewise, the other wing will have higher sweep and less drag.

Of course you can have too much sweep, otherwise all planes would just sweep their wings completely away and look like the X-24. Your previous question addresses other properties of swept wings well:

http://aviation.stackexchange.com/questions/1726/variable-wing-sweep-on-military-craftWhy do some military aircraft use variable-sweep wings?

There are certainly tradeoffs, but vertical surface area is still a more effective means of providing stability. The effect on swept wings of 1 degree of yaw will be less than the force created from the rear fuselage (and vertical stabilizer) being at effectively 1 degree angle of attack. Of course flying wings will primarily rely on this differential drag for stability, but they use things like clamshell brakes to create the necessary drag for extra stability and control.

More sweep is better for speed, but not so good if you want to go slower. So sweep is going to limit low speed performance, and the stability improvement will also be less as airspeed decreases.

A big benefit of swept wings is lower drag at high speed. When an aircraft with swept wings yaws, it is effectively increasing the sweep of the wing in the direction of the yaw, and decreasing the sweep of the other wing. So the wing opposite the direction of yaw will have less sweep, therefore more drag, counteracting the yaw. Likewise, the other wing will have higher sweep and less drag.

Of course you can have too much sweep, otherwise all planes would just sweep their wings completely away and look like the X-24. Your previous question addresses other properties of swept wings well:

http://aviation.stackexchange.com/questions/1726/variable-wing-sweep-on-military-craft

There are certainly tradeoffs, but vertical surface area is still a more effective means of providing stability. The effect on swept wings of 1 degree of yaw will be less than the force created from the rear fuselage (and vertical stabilizer) being at effectively 1 degree angle of attack. Of course flying wings will primarily rely on this differential drag for stability, but they use things like clamshell brakes to create the necessary drag for extra stability and control.

More sweep is better for speed, but not so good if you want to go slower. So sweep is going to limit low speed performance, and the stability improvement will also be less as airspeed decreases.

A big benefit of swept wings is lower drag at high speed. When an aircraft with swept wings yaws, it is effectively increasing the sweep of the wing in the direction of the yaw, and decreasing the sweep of the other wing. So the wing opposite the direction of yaw will have less sweep, therefore more drag, counteracting the yaw. Likewise, the other wing will have higher sweep and less drag.

Of course you can have too much sweep, otherwise all planes would just sweep their wings completely away and look like the X-24. Your previous question addresses other properties of swept wings well:

Why do some military aircraft use variable-sweep wings?

There are certainly tradeoffs, but vertical surface area is still a more effective means of providing stability. The effect on swept wings of 1 degree of yaw will be less than the force created from the rear fuselage (and vertical stabilizer) being at effectively 1 degree angle of attack. Of course flying wings will primarily rely on this differential drag for stability, but they use things like clamshell brakes to create the necessary drag for extra stability and control.

More sweep is better for speed, but not so good if you want to go slower. So sweep is going to limit low speed performance, and the stability improvement will also be less as airspeed decreases.

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A big benefit of swept wings is lower drag at high speed. When an aircraft with swept wings yaws, it is effectively increasing the sweep of the wing in the direction of the yaw, and decreasing the sweep of the other wing. So the wing opposite the direction of yaw will have less sweep, therefore more drag, counteracting the yaw. Likewise, the other wing will have higher sweep and less drag.

Of course you can have too much sweep, otherwise all planes would just sweep their wings completely away and look like the X-24. Your previous question addresses other properties of swept wings well:

http://aviation.stackexchange.com/questions/1726/variable-wing-sweep-on-military-craft

There are certainly tradeoffs, but vertical surface area is still a more effective means of providing stability. The effect on swept wings of 1 degree of yaw will be less than the force created from the rear fuselage (and vertical stabilizer) being at effectively 1 degree angle of attack. Of course flying wings will primarily rely on this differential drag for stability, but they use things like clamshell brakes to create the necessary drag for extra stability and control.

More sweep is better for speed, but not so good if you want to go slower. So sweep is going to limit low speed performance, and the stability improvement will also be less as airspeed decreases.