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That is what kneeboards are for. I'd be surprised if you haven't seeseen one, but just in case, here is what I am talking about:

enter image description here

When you clip the checklist to the kneeboard, you are holding it. When I fly, the only time I actually touch the checklist is to turn it over (when it is two sided) or to point at items as I do them.

As to whether you should hold the throttle, I will give the rather unsatisfying answer of "That is what I was always taught." That said, an examiner is going to be following the Private Pilot ACS (assuming you are in the US) and is going to be evaluating you on those items, of which, keeping your hand on the throttle during engine start is not a part.

Personally, my hand stays on the throttle during all parts of a flight that don't involve cruising. IOW, Engine start, taxing, takeoff, climb, descents, traffic pattern and, of course, landing. YMMV as it probably also depends on the airplane, whether you have an autopilot, etc.

That is what kneeboards are for. I'd be surprised if you haven't see one, but just in case, here is what I am talking about:

enter image description here

When you clip the checklist to the kneeboard, you are holding it. When I fly, the only time I actually touch the checklist is to turn it over (when it is two sided) or to point at items as I do them.

As to whether you should hold the throttle, I will give the rather unsatisfying answer of "That is what I was always taught." That said, an examiner is going to be following the Private Pilot ACS (assuming you are in the US) and is going to be evaluating you on those items, of which, keeping your hand on the throttle during engine start is not a part.

Personally, my hand stays on the throttle during all parts of a flight that don't involve cruising. IOW, Engine start, taxing, takeoff, climb, descents, traffic pattern and, of course, landing. YMMV as it probably also depends on the airplane, whether you have an autopilot, etc.

That is what kneeboards are for. I'd be surprised if you haven't seen one, but just in case, here is what I am talking about:

enter image description here

When you clip the checklist to the kneeboard, you are holding it. When I fly, the only time I actually touch the checklist is to turn it over (when it is two sided) or to point at items as I do them.

As to whether you should hold the throttle, I will give the rather unsatisfying answer of "That is what I was always taught." That said, an examiner is going to be following the Private Pilot ACS (assuming you are in the US) and is going to be evaluating you on those items, of which, keeping your hand on the throttle during engine start is not a part.

Personally, my hand stays on the throttle during all parts of a flight that don't involve cruising. IOW, Engine start, taxing, takeoff, climb, descents, traffic pattern and, of course, landing. YMMV as it probably also depends on the airplane, whether you have an autopilot, etc.

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source | link

That is what kneeboards are for. I'd be surprised if you haven't see one, but just in case, here is what I am talking about:

enter image description here

When you clip the checklist to the kneeboard, you are holding it. When I fly, the only time I actually touch the checklist is to turn it over (when it is two sided) or to point at items as I do them.

As to whether you should hold the throttle, I will give the rather unsatisfying answer of "That is what I was always taught." That said, an examiner is going to be following the Private Pilot ACS (assuming you are in the US) and is going to be evaluating you on those items, of which, keeping your hand on the throttle during engine start is not a part.

Personally, my hand stays on the throttle during all parts of a flight that don't involve cruising. IOW, Engine start, taxing, takeoff, climb, descents, traffic pattern and, of course, landing. YMMV as it probably also depends on the airplane, whether you have an autopilot, etc.