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9/11 changed the entire paradigm related to hijackings. Before that any hijacking was assumed to be so and so wanting to force the plane to go somewhere, where they would get off, or collect a ransom or whatever. It introduced the idea of airliners being turned into cruise missiles by suicidal hijackers to take out institutional structures. The 9/11 airplane brought down by the pax in PA was thought headed for the white houseWhite House.

This means that any hijacking is now assumed to be that sort of thing, instead of an excursion to Cuba. Authorities now have to prioritize pax vs, say, a seat of government. Seat of government wins.

It means also that on any hijacking in future, the pax are much more likely to intervene than in the old days, because they know they have nothing to lose. That, and and introduction of reinforced cockpit doors and changes in access protocols has resulted in hijackings being pretty rare now.

When airplanes start going places where they are not supposed to, for unknown reasons, you have to assume the worst. Hence fighter jets.

9/11 changed the entire paradigm related to hijackings. Before that any hijacking was assumed to be so and so wanting to force the plane to go somewhere, where they would get off, or collect a ransom or whatever. It introduced the idea of airliners being turned into cruise missiles by suicidal hijackers to take out institutional structures. The 9/11 airplane brought down by the pax in PA was thought headed for the white house.

This means that any hijacking is now assumed to be that sort of thing, instead of an excursion to Cuba. Authorities now have to prioritize pax vs, say, a seat of government. Seat of government wins.

It means also that on any hijacking in future, the pax are much more likely to intervene than in the old days, because they know they have nothing to lose. That, and and introduction of reinforced cockpit doors and changes in access protocols has resulted in hijackings being pretty rare now.

When airplanes start going places where they are not supposed to, for unknown reasons, you have to assume the worst. Hence fighter jets.

9/11 changed the entire paradigm related to hijackings. Before that any hijacking was assumed to be so and so wanting to force the plane to go somewhere, where they would get off, or collect a ransom or whatever. It introduced the idea of airliners being turned into cruise missiles by suicidal hijackers to take out institutional structures. The 9/11 airplane brought down by the pax in PA was thought headed for the White House.

This means that any hijacking is now assumed to be that sort of thing, instead of an excursion to Cuba. Authorities now have to prioritize pax vs, say, a seat of government. Seat of government wins.

It means also that on any hijacking in future, the pax are much more likely to intervene than in the old days, because they know they have nothing to lose. That, and and introduction of reinforced cockpit doors and changes in access protocols has resulted in hijackings being pretty rare now.

When airplanes start going places where they are not supposed to, for unknown reasons, you have to assume the worst. Hence fighter jets.

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9/11 changed the entire paradigm related to hijackings. Before that any hijacking was assumed to be so and so wanting to force the plane to go somewhere, where they would get off, or collect a ransom or whatever. It introduced the idea of airliners being turned into cruise missiles by suicidal hijackers to take out institutional structures. The 9/11 airplane brought down by the pax in PA was thought headed for the white house.

This means that any hijacking is now assumed to be that sort of thing, instead of an excursion to Cuba. Authorities now have to prioritize pax vs, say, a seat of government. Seat of government wins.

It means also that on any hijacking in future, the pax are much more likely to intervene than in the old days, because they know they have nothing to lose. That, and and introduction of reinforced cockpit doors and changes in access protocols has resulted in hijackings being pretty rare now.

When airplanes start going places where they are not supposed to, for unknown reasons, you have to assume the worst. Hence fighter jets.