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Adding in manual control mechanics for a large aircraft has serious drawbacks:

  • Weight: For a large aircraft, the weight of pulliespulleys, cables, etc., will add up quickly. This reducescosts money in fuel and by reducing the useful load of the aircraft.
  • Complexity: The manual system would have to be routed through the entire aircraft, including passing through pressure bulkheads and other structure. This takes a lot of time to design, install, and maintain. While there are certainly ways to deal with the high forces involved, that just adds more complexity.
  • Vulnerability: There have been multiple accidents in which manual control systems were improperly set up or jammed. The manual system would have to be designed so that fly-by-wire system would still work even if the manual system develops an issue. If an event is catastrophic enough to cripple all of the hydraulic/electrical systems, there's a good chance a manual system would be disabled as well.

The alternative is to design a fly-by-wirehydraulic system that can match or exceed the reliability of a manual system. Of course this is not without its own complexities and issues, but virtually all modern airliners have gone this route. The weight and complexity of a manual system are not worth the remote probability that such a system would be both necessary and useful.

Adding in manual control mechanics for a large aircraft has serious drawbacks:

  • Weight: For a large aircraft, the weight of pullies, cables, etc., will add up quickly. This reduces the useful load of the aircraft.
  • Complexity: The manual system would have to be routed through the entire aircraft, including passing through pressure bulkheads and other structure. This takes a lot of time to design, install, and maintain. While there are certainly ways to deal with the high forces involved, that just adds more complexity.
  • Vulnerability: There have been multiple accidents in which manual control systems were improperly set up or jammed. The manual system would have to be designed so that fly-by-wire system would still work even if the manual system develops an issue. If an event is catastrophic enough to cripple all of the hydraulic/electrical systems, there's a good chance a manual system would be disabled as well.

The alternative is to design a fly-by-wire system that can match or exceed the reliability of a manual system. Of course this is not without its own complexities and issues, but virtually all modern airliners have gone this route. The weight and complexity of a manual system are not worth the remote probability that such a system would be both necessary and useful.

Adding in manual control mechanics for a large aircraft has serious drawbacks:

  • Weight: For a large aircraft, the weight of pulleys, cables, etc., will add up quickly. This costs money in fuel and by reducing the useful load of the aircraft.
  • Complexity: The manual system would have to be routed through the entire aircraft, including passing through pressure bulkheads and other structure. This takes a lot of time to design, install, and maintain. While there are certainly ways to deal with the high forces involved, that just adds more complexity.
  • Vulnerability: There have been multiple accidents in which manual control systems were improperly set up or jammed. The manual system would have to be designed so that fly-by-wire system would still work even if the manual system develops an issue. If an event is catastrophic enough to cripple all of the hydraulic/electrical systems, there's a good chance a manual system would be disabled as well.

The alternative is to design a hydraulic system that can match or exceed the reliability of a manual system. Of course this is not without its own complexities and issues, but virtually all modern airliners have gone this route. The weight and complexity of a manual system are not worth the remote probability that such a system would be both necessary and useful.

1
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Adding in manual control mechanics for a large aircraft has serious drawbacks:

  • Weight: For a large aircraft, the weight of pullies, cables, etc., will add up quickly. This reduces the useful load of the aircraft.
  • Complexity: The manual system would have to be routed through the entire aircraft, including passing through pressure bulkheads and other structure. This takes a lot of time to design, install, and maintain. While there are certainly ways to deal with the high forces involved, that just adds more complexity.
  • Vulnerability: There have been multiple accidents in which manual control systems were improperly set up or jammed. The manual system would have to be designed so that fly-by-wire system would still work even if the manual system develops an issue. If an event is catastrophic enough to cripple all of the hydraulic/electrical systems, there's a good chance a manual system would be disabled as well.

The alternative is to design a fly-by-wire system that can match or exceed the reliability of a manual system. Of course this is not without its own complexities and issues, but virtually all modern airliners have gone this route. The weight and complexity of a manual system are not worth the remote probability that such a system would be both necessary and useful.