Added more details for clarification
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Vector Zita
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I noticed this question here on aviation stackexchange, and I was wondering if there is a way to deduce the minimum IFR altitude (either 1000ft or 2000ft above obstacles, depending on whether or not the aircraft flies over mountainous areas) based solely on the information provided on a SID plate? Take, for example, La Guardia Five Departure (here is its textual description and here its take-off minimums).

Could someone point me in the right direction?

EDIT:

I understand that it is not required for a pilot to be aware of the minimum IFR altitude if he is following a SID. Perhaps I am overthinking it, but I am asking because I would like to know if, theoretically, an aircraft would have the right to climb with a climb gradient less than the standard (200 FPNM) while following a SID, if

A: There is not any other minimum climb gradient assigned

B: He is above 1000ft or 2000 ft (the aforementioned "minimum IFR altitude")

I noticed this question here on aviation stackexchange, and I was wondering if there is a way to deduce the minimum IFR altitude (either 1000ft or 2000ft above obstacles, depending on whether or not the aircraft flies over mountainous areas) based solely on the information provided on a SID plate? Take, for example, La Guardia Five Departure (here is its textual description and here its take-off minimums).

Could someone point me in the right direction?

I noticed this question here on aviation stackexchange, and I was wondering if there is a way to deduce the minimum IFR altitude (either 1000ft or 2000ft above obstacles, depending on whether or not the aircraft flies over mountainous areas) based solely on the information provided on a SID plate? Take, for example, La Guardia Five Departure (here is its textual description and here its take-off minimums).

Could someone point me in the right direction?

EDIT:

I understand that it is not required for a pilot to be aware of the minimum IFR altitude if he is following a SID. Perhaps I am overthinking it, but I am asking because I would like to know if, theoretically, an aircraft would have the right to climb with a climb gradient less than the standard (200 FPNM) while following a SID, if

A: There is not any other minimum climb gradient assigned

B: He is above 1000ft or 2000 ft (the aforementioned "minimum IFR altitude")

Source Link
Vector Zita
  • 1.8k
  • 1
  • 7
  • 23

Can I find the minimum IFR altitude based only on a SID plate?

I noticed this question here on aviation stackexchange, and I was wondering if there is a way to deduce the minimum IFR altitude (either 1000ft or 2000ft above obstacles, depending on whether or not the aircraft flies over mountainous areas) based solely on the information provided on a SID plate? Take, for example, La Guardia Five Departure (here is its textual description and here its take-off minimums).

Could someone point me in the right direction?