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3 in title, "it's" to "its" -- possessive pronouns (his, her, its, etc) never have apostrophes. "It's" = contraction, "it is". Always. Only.
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Is it possible to determine the approximate climb rate of an aircraft knowing it'sits top speed, engine power and weight?

2 deleted 3 characters in body
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Is it possible to determine the initial climb rate of a craft with a few key pieces of data such as top speed, engine power and weight?

For example the XB-42 was an experimental bomber design from the WW2 era.

XB-42 in flight

It'sIts top speed was 660 km/h at 7,145 meters.

It'sIts empty weight was 9,475 kg and maximum weight was 16,194 Kg.

It'sIts twin engines produced a total of 2,498 kW at takeoff and 2,834 kW using war emergency power.

Is that enough information to determine the approximate climb rate? Thanks so much for any help!

Is it possible to determine the initial climb rate of a craft with a few key pieces of data such as top speed, engine power and weight?

For example the XB-42 was an experimental bomber design from the WW2 era.

XB-42 in flight

It's top speed was 660 km/h at 7,145 meters.

It's empty weight was 9,475 kg and maximum weight was 16,194 Kg.

It's twin engines produced a total of 2,498 kW at takeoff and 2,834 kW using war emergency power.

Is that enough information to determine the approximate climb rate? Thanks so much for any help!

Is it possible to determine the initial climb rate of a craft with a few key pieces of data such as top speed, engine power and weight?

For example the XB-42 was an experimental bomber design from the WW2 era.

XB-42 in flight

Its top speed was 660 km/h at 7,145 meters.

Its empty weight was 9,475 kg and maximum weight was 16,194 Kg.

Its twin engines produced a total of 2,498 kW at takeoff and 2,834 kW using war emergency power.

Is that enough information to determine the approximate climb rate? Thanks so much for any help!

1
source | link

Is it possible to determine the approximate climb rate of an aircraft knowing it's top speed, engine power and weight?

Is it possible to determine the initial climb rate of a craft with a few key pieces of data such as top speed, engine power and weight?

For example the XB-42 was an experimental bomber design from the WW2 era.

XB-42 in flight

It's top speed was 660 km/h at 7,145 meters.

It's empty weight was 9,475 kg and maximum weight was 16,194 Kg.

It's twin engines produced a total of 2,498 kW at takeoff and 2,834 kW using war emergency power.

Is that enough information to determine the approximate climb rate? Thanks so much for any help!