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Let's say the current outside air temp is 15 C and you have decided to use 50 C as the today's assumed temperature for your takeoff. In this case, use of the T/O weight the assumed temp thrust supports givegives you the balanced V1.

But our company rules isare to use the T/O speeds of the "acutual" T/O weight instead of those that the T/O weight the assumed temp thrust applied provides. I assume this rule has been made to give a greater safety margin for a runway overrun in the event of a possible rejected takeoff at the expense of decreased obstacle clearance, since use of the actual takeoff weight invariably brings lower V1, Vr, and V2 speed than when the T/O weight of the assumed temp thrust is used. My question is: is it a common practice among commericial airlines to use the actual T/O weight instead of the assumed temp T/O weight?

Let's say the current outside air temp is 15 C and you have decided to use 50 C as the today's assumed temperature for your takeoff. In this case, use of the T/O weight the assumed temp thrust supports give you the balanced V1.

But our company rules is to use the T/O speeds of the "acutual" T/O weight instead of those that the T/O weight the assumed temp thrust applied provides. I assume this rule has been made to give a greater safety margin for a runway overrun in the event of a possible rejected takeoff at the expense of decreased obstacle clearance, since use of the actual takeoff weight invariably brings lower V1, Vr, and V2 speed than when the T/O weight of the assumed temp thrust is used. My question is: is it a common practice among commericial airlines to use the actual T/O weight instead of the assumed temp T/O weight?

Let's say the current outside air temp is 15 C and you have decided to use 50 C as the today's assumed temperature for your takeoff. In this case, use of the T/O weight the assumed temp thrust supports gives you the balanced V1.

But our company rules are to use the T/O speeds of the "acutual" T/O weight instead of those that the T/O weight the assumed temp thrust applied provides. I assume this rule has been made to give a greater safety margin for a runway overrun in the event of a possible rejected takeoff at the expense of decreased obstacle clearance, since use of the actual takeoff weight invariably brings lower V1, Vr, and V2 speed than when the T/O weight of the assumed temp thrust is used. My question is: is it a common practice among commericial airlines to use the actual T/O weight instead of the assumed temp T/O weight?

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Is it a common airline practice to base T/O speeds on the actual T/O weight when an assumed temp thrust is used?

Let's say the current outside air temp is 15 C and you have decided to use 50 C as the today's assumed temperature for your takeoff. In this case, use of the T/O weight the assumed temp thrust supports give you the balanced V1.

But our company rules is to use the T/O speeds of the "acutual" T/O weight instead of those that the T/O weight the assumed temp thrust applied provides. I assume this rule has been made to give a greater safety margin for a runway overrun in the event of a possible rejected takeoff at the expense of decreased obstacle clearance, since use of the actual takeoff weight invariably brings lower V1, Vr, and V2 speed than when the T/O weight of the assumed temp thrust is used. My question is: is it a common practice among commericial airlines to use the actual T/O weight instead of the assumed temp T/O weight?