7 added 58 characters in body
source | link

Should very well be possible. The Wright Flyer had an empty weight of 274 kg, and an engine that developed 12 hp, so you're way ahead there.

enter image description here

As for the propeller, you want the tips not to exceed critical Mach number because of the increase in drag for no gain in thrust, so tip speed needs to stay below 340 m/s. At max torque RPM of 2,500, your engine is doing 262 rad/sec. The drawing shows a prop with diameter 1.2m, resulting in a tip speed of 262 * 0.6 = 157.2 m/s or Mach 0.46. A bit low, longer blades would be better. No need to gear down.

It may be a bit impractical to use a propeller longer than 1.2m, best to use the largest standard diameter propeller that can be accommodated. Of course, the engine will need to be able to reach 2,500 rpm, where its maximum torque is developed. Required torque and thrust go up with RPM$^2$, torque goes up with $R^3$, thrust only with $R^2$. Large propellers convert the horsepower into maximum thrust better, and this is the area where the Wright brothers made optimal use of the available horsepower, driving two huge2m, slow turning propellers.

An "educated" guess at torque & thrust here. I would say you'd need the longest standard size propeller that is your craft can accommodate without hitting the ground during TO/landing, with the highest pitch available. If 1.2m is max diameter you may want to use a 4-bladed one.

Should very well be possible. The Wright Flyer had an empty weight of 274 kg, and an engine that developed 12 hp, so you're way ahead there.

enter image description here

As for the propeller, you want the tips not to exceed critical Mach number because of the increase in drag for no gain in thrust, so tip speed needs to stay below 340 m/s. At max torque RPM of 2,500, your engine is doing 262 rad/sec. The drawing shows a prop with diameter 1.2m, resulting in a tip speed of 262 * 0.6 = 157.2 m/s or Mach 0.46. A bit low, longer blades would be better. No need to gear down.

It may be a bit impractical to use a propeller longer than 1.2m, best to use the largest standard diameter propeller that can be accommodated. Of course, the engine will need to be able to reach 2,500 rpm, where its maximum torque is developed. Required torque and thrust go up with RPM$^2$, torque goes up with $R^3$, thrust only with $R^2$. Large propellers convert the horsepower into maximum thrust better, and this is the area where the Wright brothers made optimal use of the available horsepower, driving two huge, slow turning propellers.

An "educated" guess at torque & thrust here. I would say you'd need the longest standard size propeller that is your craft can accommodate without hitting the ground during TO/landing, with the highest pitch available.

Should very well be possible. The Wright Flyer had an empty weight of 274 kg, and an engine that developed 12 hp, so you're way ahead there.

enter image description here

As for the propeller, you want the tips not to exceed critical Mach number because of the increase in drag for no gain in thrust, so tip speed needs to stay below 340 m/s. At max torque RPM of 2,500, your engine is doing 262 rad/sec. The drawing shows a prop with diameter 1.2m, resulting in a tip speed of 262 * 0.6 = 157.2 m/s or Mach 0.46. A bit low, longer blades would be better. No need to gear down.

It may be a bit impractical to use a propeller longer than 1.2m, best to use the largest standard diameter propeller that can be accommodated. Of course, the engine will need to be able to reach 2,500 rpm, where its maximum torque is developed. Required torque and thrust go up with RPM$^2$, torque goes up with $R^3$, thrust only with $R^2$. Large propellers convert the horsepower into maximum thrust better, and this is the area where the Wright brothers made optimal use of the available horsepower, driving two 2m, slow turning propellers.

An "educated" guess at torque & thrust here. I would say you'd need the longest standard size propeller that is your craft can accommodate without hitting the ground during TO/landing, with the highest pitch available. If 1.2m is max diameter you may want to use a 4-bladed one.

6 What did you mean 2m propeller.
source | link

Should very well be possible. The Wright Flyer had an empty weight of 274 kg, and an engine that developed 12 hp, so you're way ahead there.

enter image description here

As for the propeller, you want the tips not to exceed critical Mach number because of the increase in drag for no gain in thrust, so tip speed needs to stay below 340 m/s. At max torque RPM of 2,500, your engine is doing 262 rad/sec. The drawing shows a prop with diameter 1.2m, resulting in a tip speed of 262 * 0.6 = 157.2 m/s or Mach 0.46. A bit low, longer blades would be better. No need to gear down.

It may be a bit impractical to use a propeller longer than 1.2m, best to use the largest standard diameter propeller that is still practicalcan be accommodated. Of course, the engine will need to be able to reach 2,500 rpm, where its maximum torque is developed. Required torque and thrust go up with RPM$^2$, torque goes up with $R^3$, thrust only with $R^2$. AndLarge propellers convert the horsepower into maximum thrust better, and this is the area where the Wright brothers made optimal use of the available horsepower, driving two huge, slow turning propellers.

An "educated" guess at torque & thrust here. I would say you'd need the longest standard size propeller that is your craft can accommodate without hitting the ground during TO/landing, with the highest pitch available.

Should very well be possible. The Wright Flyer had an empty weight of 274 kg, and an engine that developed 12 hp, so you're way ahead there.

enter image description here

As for the propeller, you want the tips not to exceed critical Mach number because of the increase in drag for no gain in thrust, so tip speed needs to stay below 340 m/s. At max torque RPM of 2,500, your engine is doing 262 rad/sec. The drawing shows a prop with diameter 1.2m, resulting in a tip speed of 262 * 0.6 = 157.2 m/s or Mach 0.46. A bit low, longer blades would be better. No need to gear down.

It may be a bit impractical to use a propeller longer than 1.2m, best to use the largest standard diameter propeller that is still practical. Of course, the engine will need to be able to reach 2,500 rpm, where its maximum torque is developed. Required torque and thrust go up with RPM$^2$, torque goes up with $R^3$, thrust only with $R^2$. And this is the area where the Wright brothers made optimal use of the available horsepower, driving two huge, slow turning propellers.

An "educated" guess at torque & thrust here. I would say you'd need the longest standard size propeller that is your craft can accommodate without hitting the ground during TO/landing, with the highest pitch available.

Should very well be possible. The Wright Flyer had an empty weight of 274 kg, and an engine that developed 12 hp, so you're way ahead there.

enter image description here

As for the propeller, you want the tips not to exceed critical Mach number because of the increase in drag for no gain in thrust, so tip speed needs to stay below 340 m/s. At max torque RPM of 2,500, your engine is doing 262 rad/sec. The drawing shows a prop with diameter 1.2m, resulting in a tip speed of 262 * 0.6 = 157.2 m/s or Mach 0.46. A bit low, longer blades would be better. No need to gear down.

It may be a bit impractical to use a propeller longer than 1.2m, best to use the largest standard diameter propeller that can be accommodated. Of course, the engine will need to be able to reach 2,500 rpm, where its maximum torque is developed. Required torque and thrust go up with RPM$^2$, torque goes up with $R^3$, thrust only with $R^2$. Large propellers convert the horsepower into maximum thrust better, and this is the area where the Wright brothers made optimal use of the available horsepower, driving two huge, slow turning propellers.

An "educated" guess at torque & thrust here. I would say you'd need the longest standard size propeller that is your craft can accommodate without hitting the ground during TO/landing, with the highest pitch available.

5 added 51 characters in body
source | link

Should very well be possible. The Wright Flyer had an empty weight of 274 kg, and an engine that developed 12 hp, so you're way ahead there.

enter image description here

As for the propeller, you want the tips not to exceed critical Mach number because of the increase in drag for no gain in thrust, so tip speed needs to stay below 340 m/s. At max torque RPM of 2,500, your engine is doing 262 rad/sec, with. The drawing shows a propeller of 1 m radius = 2 mprop with diameter you're at1.2m, resulting in a tip speed of 262 * 0.6 = 157.2 m/s or Mach 0.46. A bit low, still way below the speed of soundlonger blades would be better. No need to gear down.

It may be a bit impractical to use a 2m propeller longer than 1.2m, so best to use the largest standard diameter propeller that is still practical. Of course, the engine will need to be able to reach 2,500 rpm, where its maximum torque is developed. Required torque and thrust go up with RPM$^2$, torque goes up with $R^3$, thrust only with $R^2$. And this is the area where the Wright brothers made optimal use of the available horsepower, driving two huge, slow turning propellers.

An "educated" guess at torque & thrust here. I would say you'd need the longest standard size propeller that is your craft can accommodate without hitting the ground during TO/landing, with the highest pitch available.

Should very well be possible. The Wright Flyer had an empty weight of 274 kg, and an engine that developed 12 hp, so you're way ahead there.

enter image description here

As for the propeller, you want the tips not to exceed critical Mach number because of the increase in drag for no gain in thrust, so tip speed needs to stay below 340 m/s. At max torque RPM of 2,500, your engine is doing 262 rad/sec, with a propeller of 1 m radius = 2 m diameter you're at tip speed 262 m/s, still way below the speed of sound. No need to gear down.

It may be a bit impractical to use a 2m propeller, so best to use the largest standard diameter propeller that is still practical. Of course, the engine will need to be able to reach 2,500 rpm, where its maximum torque is developed. Required torque and thrust go up with RPM$^2$, torque goes up with $R^3$, thrust only with $R^2$. And this is the area where the Wright brothers made optimal use of the available horsepower, driving two huge, slow turning propellers.

An "educated" guess at torque & thrust here. I would say you'd need the longest standard size propeller that is your craft can accommodate without hitting the ground during TO/landing, with the highest pitch available.

Should very well be possible. The Wright Flyer had an empty weight of 274 kg, and an engine that developed 12 hp, so you're way ahead there.

enter image description here

As for the propeller, you want the tips not to exceed critical Mach number because of the increase in drag for no gain in thrust, so tip speed needs to stay below 340 m/s. At max torque RPM of 2,500, your engine is doing 262 rad/sec. The drawing shows a prop with diameter 1.2m, resulting in a tip speed of 262 * 0.6 = 157.2 m/s or Mach 0.46. A bit low, longer blades would be better. No need to gear down.

It may be a bit impractical to use a propeller longer than 1.2m, best to use the largest standard diameter propeller that is still practical. Of course, the engine will need to be able to reach 2,500 rpm, where its maximum torque is developed. Required torque and thrust go up with RPM$^2$, torque goes up with $R^3$, thrust only with $R^2$. And this is the area where the Wright brothers made optimal use of the available horsepower, driving two huge, slow turning propellers.

An "educated" guess at torque & thrust here. I would say you'd need the longest standard size propeller that is your craft can accommodate without hitting the ground during TO/landing, with the highest pitch available.

4 semantics
source | link
3 added 155 characters in body
source | link
2 added 955 characters in body
source | link
1
source | link