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Why do some countries separate a transition level and a transition altitude?

The US airway system uses thea single transition level (or altitude), but some other countries like China separate thea transtion altitude and thea transition level with the transition layer in between.

Could anybody kindly explain why they use this type of separate transition system? I can guess it's there to prevent possible mid-air collisions between two aircraft using two different altimeter settings (QNH and QNE) but I don't understand how exactly that works.

Why do some countries separate transition level and transition altitude?

The US airway system uses the single transition level (or altitude), but some other countries like China separate the transtion altitude and the transition level with the transition layer in between.

Could anybody kindly explain why they use this type of separate transition system? I can guess it's there to prevent possible mid-air collisions between two aircraft using two different altimeter settings (QNH and QNE) but I don't understand how exactly that works.

Why do some countries separate a transition level and a transition altitude?

The US airway system uses a single transition level (or altitude), but some other countries like China separate a transtion altitude and a transition level with the transition layer in between.

Could anybody kindly explain why they use this type of separate transition system? I can guess it's there to prevent possible mid-air collisions between two aircraft using two different altimeter settings (QNH and QNE) but I don't understand how exactly that works.

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Why do some countries separate transition level and transition altitude?

The US airway system uses the single transition level (or altitude), but some other countries like China separate the transtion altitude and the transition level with the transition layer in between.

Could anybody kindly explain why they use this type of separate transition system? I can guess it's there to prevent possible mid-air collisions between two aircraft using two different altimeter settings (QNH and QNE) but I don't understand how exactly that works.