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If at zero airspeed and zero absolute altitude this were to happen, then yes the aircraft would stall and be incapable of flying. Then again, at this point, it would not matter, AS THE AIRPLANE IS ALREADY ON THE GROUND IN THIS STATE.

In all seriousness, though, the airplane would not slow and stall unless you attempted to remain at a constant altitude. In a constant airspeed glide, however, where the airplane is descending at a shallow angle relative to the ground, it can be shown that the force of gravity is no longer perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the aircraft and will have a component vector which is parallel to the longitudinal axis and opposed to the direction of both the induced and parasite drag vectors.

Another way to think of this is to consider the energy state of the airplane at the time the engine quits. It's Its total energy is the sum of its potential energy, proportional to its absolute altitude, and its kinetic energy, proportional to the square of the groundspeed. Once engine thrust is lost, that energy state begins to be drained away by the force of drag applied over a distance. In order to maintain airspeed, the aircraft must begin to convert its potential energy into kinetic energy, causing the airplane to descentdescend slowly until it reaches the ground.

If at zero airspeed and zero absolute altitude this were to happen, then yes the aircraft would stall and be incapable of flying. Then again, at this point, it would not matter, AS THE AIRPLANE IS ALREADY ON THE GROUND IN THIS STATE.

In all seriousness, though, the airplane would not slow and stall unless you attempted to remain at a constant altitude. In a constant airspeed glide, however, where the airplane is descending at a shallow angle relative to the ground, it can be shown that the force of gravity is no longer perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the aircraft and will have a component vector which is parallel to the longitudinal axis and opposed to the direction of both the induced and parasite drag vectors.

Another way to think of this is to consider the energy state of the airplane at the time the engine quits. It's total energy is the sum of its potential energy, proportional to its absolute altitude, and its kinetic energy, proportional to the square of the groundspeed. Once engine thrust is lost, that energy state begins to be drained away by the force of drag applied over a distance. In order to maintain airspeed, the aircraft must begin to convert its potential energy into kinetic energy, causing the airplane to descent slowly until it reaches the ground.

If at zero airspeed and zero absolute altitude this were to happen, then yes the aircraft would stall and be incapable of flying. Then again, at this point, it would not matter, AS THE AIRPLANE IS ALREADY ON THE GROUND IN THIS STATE.

In all seriousness, though, the airplane would not slow and stall unless you attempted to remain at a constant altitude. In a constant airspeed glide, however, where the airplane is descending at a shallow angle relative to the ground, it can be shown that the force of gravity is no longer perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the aircraft and will have a component vector which is parallel to the longitudinal axis and opposed to the direction of both the induced and parasite drag vectors.

Another way to think of this is to consider the energy state of the airplane at the time the engine quits. Its total energy is the sum of its potential energy, proportional to its absolute altitude, and its kinetic energy, proportional to the square of the groundspeed. Once engine thrust is lost, that energy state begins to be drained away by the force of drag applied over a distance. In order to maintain airspeed, the aircraft must begin to convert its potential energy into kinetic energy, causing the airplane to descend slowly until it reaches the ground.

2 added 3 characters in body
source | link

If at zero airspeed and zero absolute altitude this were to happen, then yes the aircraft would stall and be incapable of flying. Then again, at this point, it would not matter, AS THE AIRPLANE IS ALREADY ON THE GROUND IN THIS STATE.

In all seriousness, though, the airplane would not slow and stall unless you attempted to remain at a constant altitude. In a constant airspeed glide, however, where the airplane is descending at a shallow angle relative to the ground, it can be shown that the force of gravity is no longer perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the aircraft and will have a component vector which is parallel to the longitudinal axis and opposed to the direction of both the induced and parasite drag vectors.

Another way to think of this is to consider the energy state of the airplane at the time the engine quits. It's total energy is the sum of its potential energy, proportional to its absolute altitude, and its kinetic energy, proportional to the square of the groundspeed. Once engine thrust is lost, that energy state begins to be drained away by the force of drag applied over a distance. In order to maintain airspeed, the aircraft must begin to convert its potential energy into kinetic energy, causing the airplane to descent slowly until it reaches the ground.

If at zero airspeed and zero absolute altitude this were to happen, then yes the aircraft would stall and be incapable of flying. Then again, at this point, it would not matter, AS THE AIRPLANE IS ALREADY ON THE GROUND IN THIS STATE.

In all seriousness, though, the airplane would not slow and stall unless you attempted to remain at a constant altitude. In a constant airspeed glide, however, where the airplane is descending at a shallow angle relative to the ground, it can be shown that the force of gravity is no longer perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the aircraft and will have a component vector which is parallel to the longitudinal axis and opposed to the direction of both the induced and parasite drag vectors.

Another way to think of this to consider the energy state of the airplane at the time the engine quits. It's total energy is the sum of its potential energy, proportional to its absolute altitude, and its kinetic energy, proportional to the square of the groundspeed. Once engine thrust is lost, that energy state begins to be drained away by the force of drag applied over a distance. In order to maintain airspeed, the aircraft must begin to convert its potential energy into kinetic energy, causing the airplane to descent slowly until it reaches the ground.

If at zero airspeed and zero absolute altitude this were to happen, then yes the aircraft would stall and be incapable of flying. Then again, at this point, it would not matter, AS THE AIRPLANE IS ALREADY ON THE GROUND IN THIS STATE.

In all seriousness, though, the airplane would not slow and stall unless you attempted to remain at a constant altitude. In a constant airspeed glide, however, where the airplane is descending at a shallow angle relative to the ground, it can be shown that the force of gravity is no longer perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the aircraft and will have a component vector which is parallel to the longitudinal axis and opposed to the direction of both the induced and parasite drag vectors.

Another way to think of this is to consider the energy state of the airplane at the time the engine quits. It's total energy is the sum of its potential energy, proportional to its absolute altitude, and its kinetic energy, proportional to the square of the groundspeed. Once engine thrust is lost, that energy state begins to be drained away by the force of drag applied over a distance. In order to maintain airspeed, the aircraft must begin to convert its potential energy into kinetic energy, causing the airplane to descent slowly until it reaches the ground.

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source | link

If at zero airspeed and zero absolute altitude this were to happen, then yes the aircraft would stall and be incapable of flying. Then again, at this point, it would not matter, AS THE AIRPLANE IS ALREADY ON THE GROUND IN THIS STATE.

In all seriousness, though, the airplane would not slow and stall unless you attempted to remain at a constant altitude. In a constant airspeed glide, however, where the airplane is descending at a shallow angle relative to the ground, it can be shown that the force of gravity is no longer perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the aircraft and will have a component vector which is parallel to the longitudinal axis and opposed to the direction of both the induced and parasite drag vectors.

Another way to think of this to consider the energy state of the airplane at the time the engine quits. It's total energy is the sum of its potential energy, proportional to its absolute altitude, and its kinetic energy, proportional to the square of the groundspeed. Once engine thrust is lost, that energy state begins to be drained away by the force of drag applied over a distance. In order to maintain airspeed, the aircraft must begin to convert its potential energy into kinetic energy, causing the airplane to descent slowly until it reaches the ground.