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If I were standing outside on a windy day holding a flat rectangular object such as a food tray up in the wind, orthogonal to the direction of flow, the drag created would be classified, mostly, as form drag; a differential in pressure from the higher pressure upwind side of the tray and its lower pressure downwind side.

If an airplane's wing began at a 0 degree angle of attack and were slowly rotated to a 90 degree angle of attack, lift would increase until the critical angle of attack is exceeded, but the coefficient of drag would continue to increase up to 90 degrees.

I assume the induced drag created by the wing at 90 degrees is much like the form drag created by the tray in the wind.

Is induced drag nothing more than form drag with a different classification due to its usual nature of discussion in regards to lift?

If I were standing outside on a windy day holding a flat rectangular object such as a food tray up in the wind, orthogonal to the direction of flow, the drag created would be classified, mostly, as form drag; a differential in pressure from the higher pressure upwind side of the tray and its lower pressure downwind side.

If an airplane's wing began at a 0 degree angle of attack and were slowly rotated to a 90 degree angle of attack, lift would increase until the critical angle of attack is exceeded, but the coefficient of drag would continue to increase up to 90 degrees.

I assume the induced drag created by the wing at 90 degrees is much like the form drag created by the tray in the wind.

Is induced drag nothing more than form drag with a different classification due to its usual nature of discussion in regards to lift?

If I were standing outside on a windy day holding a flat rectangular object such as a food tray up in the wind, orthogonal to the direction of flow, the drag created would be classified, mostly, as form drag; a differential in pressure from the higher pressure upwind side of the tray and its lower pressure downwind side.

If an airplane's wing began at a 0 degree angle of attack and were slowly rotated to a 90 degree angle of attack, lift would increase until the critical angle of attack is exceeded, but the coefficient of drag would continue to increase up to 90 degrees.

I assume the drag created by the wing at 90 degrees is much like the form drag created by the tray in the wind.

Is induced drag nothing more than form drag with a different classification due to its usual nature of discussion in regards to lift?

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Is induced drag essentially nothing more than a specific type of form drag?

If I were standing outside on a windy day holding a flat rectangular object such as a food tray up in the wind, orthogonal to the direction of flow, the drag created would be classified, mostly, as form drag; a differential in pressure from the higher pressure upwind side of the tray and its lower pressure downwind side.

If an airplane's wing began at a 0 degree angle of attack and were slowly rotated to a 90 degree angle of attack, lift would increase until the critical angle of attack is exceeded, but the coefficient of drag would continue to increase up to 90 degrees.

I assume the induced drag created by the wing at 90 degrees is much like the form drag created by the tray in the wind.

Is induced drag nothing more than form drag with a different classification due to its usual nature of discussion in regards to lift?