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I have never experienced engine problems on descent, but I have experienced 2 engine failures shortly after take-off. OneOne cylinder head crack about 5 minutes after take-off(C-150) and one stuck valve(C-172) less than a minute after take-off. I

I cannot be sure the exact cause, but I suspect the rapid heating of the engine had the same negative effect, but in reverse order, of shock cooling. Now

Now, I make sure the engine is warm (via what ever is available...) before take off. The checklist may say "eng temp in the green", but why not let it climb up toward the middle of the green a little further to allow the engine to expand a little more before adding full power on take-off? The engine still has some heating and expanding to do while at idle, and is about to heat rapidly once take-off power is applied. Maybe

Maybe the majority of the engine stress/damage happens at take-off, not on descent.

I have never experienced engine problems on descent, but I have experienced 2 engine failures shortly after take-off. One cylinder head crack about 5 minutes after take-off(C-150) and one stuck valve(C-172) less than a minute after take-off. I cannot be sure the exact cause, but I suspect the rapid heating of the engine had the same negative effect, but in reverse order, of shock cooling. Now, I make sure the engine is warm (via what ever is available...) before take off. The checklist may say "eng temp in the green", but why not let it climb up toward the middle of the green a little further to allow the engine to expand a little more before adding full power on take-off? The engine still has some heating and expanding to do while at idle, and is about to heat rapidly once take-off power is applied. Maybe the majority of the engine stress/damage happens at take-off, not on descent.

I have never experienced engine problems on descent, but I have experienced 2 engine failures shortly after take-off. One cylinder head crack about 5 minutes after take-off(C-150) and one stuck valve(C-172) less than a minute after take-off.

I cannot be sure the exact cause, but I suspect the rapid heating of the engine had the same negative effect, but in reverse order, of shock cooling.

Now, I make sure the engine is warm (via what ever is available...) before take off. The checklist may say "eng temp in the green", but why not let it climb up toward the middle of the green a little further to allow the engine to expand a little more before adding full power on take-off? The engine still has some heating and expanding to do while at idle, and is about to heat rapidly once take-off power is applied.

Maybe the majority of the engine stress/damage happens at take-off, not on descent.

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I have never experienced engine problems on descent, but I have experienced 2 engine failures shortly after take-off. One cylinder head crack about 5 minutes after take-off(C-150) and one stuck valve(C-172) less than a minute after take-off. I cannot be sure the exact cause, but I suspect the rapid heating of the engine had the same negative effect, but in reverse order, of shock cooling. Now, I make sure the engine is warm (via what ever is available...) before take off. The checklist may say "eng temp in the green", but why not let it climb up toward the middle of the green a little further to allow the engine to expand a little more before adding full power on take-off? The engine still has some heating and expanding to do while at idle, and is about to heat rapidly once take-off power is applied. Maybe the majority of the engine stress/damage happens at take-off, not on descent.