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While this question already has an answer as to why the VC-25 has not been replaced yet, it does not address the question of why the VC-25 was based off the 747-200 in the first place.

As you mention, the aircraft entered service in 1990, however it'sits first flight was back in 1987. This was before the -400 took flight, so this could not have been considered. The VC-25 featured a lot of modifications, none of which had been done before on a 747. A long period of planning would need to go into this, so the program launch and initial order would probably have begun a good few years before this date.

You are therefore looking at an order date of around 1985, shortly after the introduction of the -300. The -300 offered a number of benefits over the -200, such as greater capacity and improved operating economics. Capacity would not be of much benefit to the VC-25 program.

Given the timescales, the -200 would be nearing the end of production, so these would have been some of the last -200s off the line. Boeing may well have offered a good deal on these now superseded aircraft. The discounts offered would have gone a long way to offset any increase in operating costs, especially due to how infrequently the aircraft operates.

That is probably why the -200 was chosen. There was simply no benefit of operating the -300, and overall program costs would have likely been higher.

While this question already has an answer as to why the VC-25 has not been replaced yet, it does not address the question of why the VC-25 was based off the 747-200 in the first place.

As you mention, the aircraft entered service in 1990, however it's first flight was back in 1987. This was before the -400 took flight, so this could not have been considered. The VC-25 featured a lot of modifications, none of which had been done before on a 747. A long period of planning would need to go into this, so the program launch and initial order would probably have begun a good few years before this date.

You are therefore looking at an order date of around 1985, shortly after the introduction of the -300. The -300 offered a number of benefits over the -200, such as greater capacity and improved operating economics. Capacity would not be of much benefit to the VC-25 program.

Given the timescales, the -200 would be nearing the end of production, so these would have been some of the last -200s off the line. Boeing may well have offered a good deal on these now superseded aircraft. The discounts offered would have gone a long way to offset any increase in operating costs, especially due to how infrequently the aircraft operates.

That is probably why the -200 was chosen. There was simply no benefit of operating the -300, and overall program costs would have likely been higher.

While this question already has an answer as to why the VC-25 has not been replaced yet, it does not address the question of why the VC-25 was based off the 747-200 in the first place.

As you mention, the aircraft entered service in 1990, however its first flight was back in 1987. This was before the -400 took flight, so this could not have been considered. The VC-25 featured a lot of modifications, none of which had been done before on a 747. A long period of planning would need to go into this, so the program launch and initial order would probably have begun a good few years before this date.

You are therefore looking at an order date of around 1985, shortly after the introduction of the -300. The -300 offered a number of benefits over the -200, such as greater capacity and improved operating economics. Capacity would not be of much benefit to the VC-25 program.

Given the timescales, the -200 would be nearing the end of production, so these would have been some of the last -200s off the line. Boeing may well have offered a good deal on these now superseded aircraft. The discounts offered would have gone a long way to offset any increase in operating costs, especially due to how infrequently the aircraft operates.

That is probably why the -200 was chosen. There was simply no benefit of operating the -300, and overall program costs would have likely been higher.

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source | link

While this question already has an answer as to why the VC-25 has not been replaced yet, it does not address the question of why the VC-25 was based off the 747-200 in the first place.

As you mention, the aircraft entered service in 1990, however it's first flight was back in 1987. This was before the -400 took flight, so this could not have been considered. The VC-25 featured a lot of modifications, none of which had been done before on a 747. A long period of planning would need to go into this, so the program launch and initial order would probably have begun a good few years before this date.

You are therefore looking at an order date of around 1985, shortly after the introduction of the -300. The -300 offered a number of benefits over the -200, such as greater capacity and improved operating economics. Capacity would not be of much benefit to the VC-25 program.

Given the timescales, the -200 would be nearing the end of production, so these would have been some of the last -200s off the line. Boeing may well have offered a good deal on these now superseded aircraft. The discounts offered would have gone a long way to offset any increase in operating costs, especially due to how infrequently the aircraft operates.

That is probably why the -200 was chosen. There was simply no benefit of operating the -300, and overall program costs would have likely been higher.