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Raising Is it considered good or bad practice to raise the flaps right after touchdown. Good or bad?

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This question is about light, tricycle, single engine aircraft.

I have made it a habit to raise the flaps right after touchdown (when the nosewheel is on the ground). My instructor used to do that every time during initial training so I took over the habit.

It makes sense to do this for the following reasons:

  • better braking performance because lift is reduced while rolling out
  • less crosswind effect, reducing the risk of loss of directional control after landing
  • (less important) it's part of the after landing checklist, so when it's done, it's done

However, I was recently checked out on a C182 that I wanted to rent in Florida and when I raised the flaps right after touchdown the instructor shouted "what the < beep > are you doing? You should never raise the flaps until you've turned off the runway". He couldn't provide a good reason though, so when I told him about the things I listed above he simple mumbled something about keeping my attention on the runway instead of fiddling with the flaps lever (which is a something I don't even have to think about)

My question is: is it really a bad idea to raise the flaps that soon after landing? Or is it actually a good habit?Is it really a bad idea to raise the flaps that soon after landing? Or is it actually a good habit?

(I noticed that most airliners also wait until they're clear of the runway, but these jets have spoilers to get rid of all the lift)

This question is about light, tricycle, single engine aircraft.

I have made it a habit to raise the flaps right after touchdown (when the nosewheel is on the ground). My instructor used to do that every time during initial training so I took over the habit.

It makes sense to do this for the following reasons:

  • better braking performance because lift is reduced while rolling out
  • less crosswind effect, reducing the risk of loss of directional control after landing
  • (less important) it's part of the after landing checklist, so when it's done, it's done

However, I was recently checked out on a C182 that I wanted to rent in Florida and when I raised the flaps right after touchdown the instructor shouted "what the < beep > are you doing? You should never raise the flaps until you've turned off the runway". He couldn't provide a good reason though, so when I told him about the things I listed above he simple mumbled something about keeping my attention on the runway instead of fiddling with the flaps lever (which is a something I don't even have to think about)

My question is: is it really a bad idea to raise the flaps that soon after landing? Or is it actually a good habit?

(I noticed that most airliners also wait until they're clear of the runway, but these jets have spoilers to get rid of all the lift)

This question is about light, tricycle, single engine aircraft.

I have made it a habit to raise the flaps right after touchdown (when the nosewheel is on the ground). My instructor used to do that every time during initial training so I took over the habit.

It makes sense to do this for the following reasons:

  • better braking performance because lift is reduced while rolling out
  • less crosswind effect, reducing the risk of loss of directional control after landing
  • (less important) it's part of the after landing checklist, so when it's done, it's done

However, I was recently checked out on a C182 that I wanted to rent in Florida and when I raised the flaps right after touchdown the instructor shouted "what the < beep > are you doing? You should never raise the flaps until you've turned off the runway". He couldn't provide a good reason though, so when I told him about the things I listed above he simple mumbled something about keeping my attention on the runway instead of fiddling with the flaps lever (which is a something I don't even have to think about)

My question is: Is it really a bad idea to raise the flaps that soon after landing? Or is it actually a good habit?

(I noticed that most airliners also wait until they're clear of the runway, but these jets have spoilers to get rid of all the lift)

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Raising the flaps right after touchdown. Good or bad?

This question is about light, tricycle, single engine aircraft.

I have made it a habit to raise the flaps right after touchdown (when the nosewheel is on the ground). My instructor used to do that every time during initial training so I took over the habit.

It makes sense to do this for the following reasons:

  • better braking performance because lift is reduced while rolling out
  • less crosswind effect, reducing the risk of loss of directional control after landing
  • (less important) it's part of the after landing checklist, so when it's done, it's done

However, I was recently checked out on a C182 that I wanted to rent in Florida and when I raised the flaps right after touchdown the instructor shouted "what the < beep > are you doing? You should never raise the flaps until you've turned off the runway". He couldn't provide a good reason though, so when I told him about the things I listed above he simple mumbled something about keeping my attention on the runway instead of fiddling with the flaps lever (which is a something I don't even have to think about)

My question is: is it really a bad idea to raise the flaps that soon after landing? Or is it actually a good habit?

(I noticed that most airliners also wait until they're clear of the runway, but these jets have spoilers to get rid of all the lift)