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I was reading an article about drones and happened to glance at an included 3-view of the General Atomics Predator series UAV. The inverted-V tail appears to leave, at most, around 6" of clearance to the ground.

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On takeoff or landing, how is there enough clearance to allow the operator to rotate? Is the wing designed to have a high angle of incidence on the ground?

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1 Answer 1

On takeoff or landing, how is there enough clearance to allow the operator to rotate?

The Predator just doesn't rotate enough to hit the tail: See this takeoff video.

Also, it lands very flat.

The drawing in your question shows that there is 5.3° of rotation angle before tailstrike occurs.

Also, from the drawing, the angle of incidence doesn't look remarkable.

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Makes sense, 5.3° just seems very, very slight, with no margin for error. –  egid Jun 23 at 2:47
    
There may be another factor at work here. For example, the aircraft I'm familiar with, classic 747s, rotate to, typically, 12 or 13 degrees nose up. Since you don't rotate until you have flying speed, the aircraft actually comes off the ground before you reach the nose up target. –  Terry Jun 24 at 19:58

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