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On SIGWX charts, it shows pairs of symbols with, say, */** or **/**. I know what the symbols mean on either side, but why are there two, and what does the slash indicate?

Would love good resources that explain more, too.

Example chart here, from the FAA sample questions (caution: 37 MB download), Figure 20, over Southern California.

I’m also interested in knowing what a dot with R underneath means.

Example chart

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1 Answer 1

http://www.beyourowncaptain.com/downloads/files/Reading%20Prog%20Charts.pdf http://aviationweather.gov/static/adds/docs/metars/wxSymbols_anno1.pdf

Asterisks are snow, dots are rain. The slash means a mixture of the two.

enter image description here

The dot with an R under it is a substitution for the the thunderstorm symbol.

enter image description here

What you're looking at isn't a real SIGWX chart, it's a testing figure.

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if it’s a mixture, then why do they show (actual example from chart) **/**? You can’t have a mixture of the same thing. –  Peter Apr 4 at 3:30
    
Can you link to the chart? –  Jungroth Apr 4 at 3:31
    
faa.gov/training_testing/testing/test_questions/media/… (caution: 37 MB download), Figure 20, over Southern California –  Peter Apr 4 at 3:33
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Honestly, I believe it's a mistake. I have found 3 sources confirming that means mix precipitation. One of them is the Aviation Weather Services advisory circular. You can see here, on page 8-3 faa.gov/documentLibrary/media/Advisory_Circular/… –  Jungroth Apr 4 at 3:42
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Jungroth: hmmm, interesting! Thanks for digging out the source material. It’s a bit strange because the **/** occurs quite a few times in the chart! –  Peter Apr 4 at 3:47
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